Teen befriended by Matt Kemp passes away

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Sad news to pass along courtesy of our friends at Yahoo! Sports. Joshua Jones, the young fan who was be befriended by Dodgers outfielder Matt Kemp earlier this year, has passed away following a battle with brain cancer. He was just 19 years old.

It was hard not to be touched when Kemp gave Jones his jersey, hat and cleats following a game in San Francisco on May 5. Video of the good deed quickly went viral.

Kemp’s relationship with Jones didn’t end there. Later that month, he flew Jones and his family from Oakland to see a Dodgers game in Los Angeles, during which he had the opportunity to meet other stars, including Angels outfielder Mike Trout and Dodgers left-hander Clayton Kershaw.

Laelah Quintor, Jones’ aunt on his mother’s side, told Yahoo! Sports that the generosity from Kemp and others gave the teen “hope again.”

This story — like Bryce Harper’s 13-year-old friend, Gavin Rupp — unfortunately has a sad ending, but Kemp deserves credit for taking a few minutes of his time to make someone’s day. It’s just a reminder of how powerful playing a kid’s game can be. RIP, Joshua.

Must-Click Link: Sherri Nichols, Sabermetic Pioneer

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If you are old enough and lame enough as I am, you may have lurked around on sabermetic message boards in the 1990s. If you did, you may have heard of Sherri Nichols, who back in the day, was a significant contributor to the advancement of statistical analysis, particularly defensive analysis.

While it’s probably better that not everyone is as old and nerdy as me, the downside of it is that most people haven’t heard of Nichols and know nothing about her contributions. That changes today with Ben Lindbergh’s excellent analysis of Nichols and her work over at The Ringer, which I recommend that you all read.

The short version: Nichols is the one who planted the seed about on-base percentage being valuable in the mind of Baseball Prospectus Founder Gary Huckabay, back in the late 80s. She’s also the one most responsible for the rise of zone-based defensive metrics in the 1990s, such as Defensive Average, which she created and which served as the basis for other such metrics going forward. She also played a critical role in the development of RetroSheet, which collected almost all extant box score and play-by-play information going back to the turn of the 20th century, thereby making so much of the information available at Baseball-Reference.com and FanGraphs possible. A key contribution there: making the information free and available to everyone, rather than closing the underlying data off as proprietary and either charging for access or keeping it in-house like some recent data collectors have chosen to do. Ahem.

A larger takeaway than all of Nichols’ contributions is just how loathe the baseball community was to listen to a woman back then. I mean, yeah, they’re still loathe to listen to women now, as indicated by the small number of women who hold jobs in baseball operations departments, but back then it was even worse, as evidenced by Lindbergh’s stories and Nichols’ anecdotes.

A great read and a great history lesson.