Chase Utley’s extension with Phillies worth up to $75 million

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Chase Utley’s contract extension with the Phillies is officially a two-year, $27 million deal, but Ken Rosenthal of FOXSports.com reports that the second baseman can earn up to $75 million depending on what happens with vesting options.

According to Rosenthal the contract includes three vesting options for $15 million each in 2016, 2017, and 2018, which are triggered if Utley reaches 500 plate appearances in the previous season. Utley will be 35 years old in a couple months and hasn’t topped 500 plate appearances in a season since 2010, so it’s certainly an interesting contract that includes other incentives and buyouts that could bring it to a maximum of $75 million over five years.

If he stays healthy and effective the Phillies would gladly pay him $15 million per season, but the vesting options remove just about all the risk from the team’s point of view. Beyond paying him $27 million for ages 35 and 36, of course, which certainly carries plenty of risk in itself. Check out Rosenthal’s full breakdown for all the other details, including what happens if Utley doesn’t reach 500 plate appearances and the Phillies get team options for those years.

Troy Tulowitzki poses as a pitcher on photo day

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Update: The photographer was apparently in on the action, according to Topps. Still pretty funny. (Hat tip: Mike Ashmore)

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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.