Bud Selig

The MLB-Biogenesis lawsuit sends a pretty chilling message

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Set aside the fact that it worked. Set aside the fact that the players who were punished got (or will be getting) what they deserved. Just ask yourself if you feel good about the fact that the lawsuit between Major League Baseball and the Biogenesis defendants enabled them to get all kinds of telecom data that people would not, in the ordinary course, be able to get:

Facebook friends. Transcripts of BlackBerry instant messages. Records of texts. Major League Baseball investigators used an arsenal of high-tech tools to collect the evidence that persuaded a dozen players to accept 50-game suspensions this week for their ties to the Biogenesis clinic … Records from Florida’s Circuit Court for Miami-Dade County that were examined by The Associated Press showed subpoenas were issued to Federal Express, AT&T Mobility, T-Mobile USA, UPS and MetroPCS. At least some of those companies complied and turned over data to the probe, one of the people said.

That’s well and good until you remember that from the moment Bosch agreed to side with Major League Baseball the lawsuit was essentially playacting. A gamed suit with both adversaries on the same side, working toward the same end, not in an actual adversarial posture to one another. They were nonetheless allowed to use the court system as a means to get at private citizens’ telecom records.

This isn’t necessarily on MLB — they had a plan and carried it out with all of the tools at their disposal — but it’s a disgrace for the court system and the telecom companies who complied with these subpoenas without a fight. The courts should be far more wary of these kinds of scams. Telecom companies should be far more protective of their customers’ records. Once they are subpoenaed they have a right to march into that court and say why they shouldn’t comply. It seems like they had ample reason to do so here but it appears as though they did not.

You may like the ends of the Biogenesis investigation, but there’s no escaping that the means were pretty damn slimy.

Braves sign former football player Sanders Commings

GLENDALE, AZ - AUGUST 15:  Cornerback Sanders Commings #26 of the Kansas City Chiefs on the sidelines during the pre-season NFL game against the Arizona Cardinals at the University of Phoenix Stadium on August 15, 2015 in Glendale, Arizona.  (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
Christian Petersen/Getty Images
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The Braves have signed former football player and current outfielder Sanders Commings, an Augusta, Georgia native, to a minor league contract, Ken Rosenthal of FOX Sports reports.

Commings, 26, was a defensive back who played for the University of Georgia before being selected by the Chiefs in the fifth round of the 2013 draft. He appeared in two games in the 2013 season.

Commings also played baseball for Westside High School and was selected by the Diamondbacks in the 37th round of the 2008 draft. He chose to attend the University of Georgia instead. When football didn’t pan out, Commings started training with Jerry Hairston, Jr. Hairston said he was “blown away” when he saw Commings hit for the first time.

Obviously, Commings’ path to success as a professional baseball player will be long, but it’s a no-risk flier for the Braves. The club has past experience with football players, including Deion Sanders and Brian Jordan.

The next task for the Braves will be to acquire Ryan Goins from the Blue Jays. That way, players will look at the lineup card each day to see if it’s Commings or Goins.

Justin Verlander: “I’d like to see the AL and NL have the same rules… I vote NL rules.”

SEATTLE, WA - AUGUST 10:  Starting pitcher Justin Verlander #35 of the Detroit Tigers pitches against the Seattle Mariners in the first inning at Safeco Field on August 10, 2016 in Seattle, Washington.  (Photo by Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images)
Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images
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On Thursday afternoon, Rays pitcher Chris Archer asked his Twitter followers, “Lots swirling around what needs to be changed about the game of baseball. What do y’all want to see changed, if anything, & why?”

Tigers ace Justin Verlander responded:

To that, Archer said:

For what it’s worth, Verlander hasn’t been much of a hitter. In 47 career plate appearances, he has three singles and no extra-base hits. And if the AL did get rid of the DH rule, the Tigers would have nowhere to put Victor Martinez. Verlander, though, would have an easier time pitching to opposing pitchers rather than their DH’s.