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Is the MLBPA’s long-standing solidarity at risk as a result of Biogenesis?


Howard Bryant has a fantastic article over at ESPN about the players union’s response to the Biogenesis scandal. In it he details how and why this PED scandal, unlike those which came before, represented the final straw for most players. Player who used to uniformly rally around those accused of cheating but who do so no longer. Who, in fact, are among the most critical voices of their fellow players.

Bryant wonders whether this shift is a harbinger of a greater fracturing of the union:

By publicly advocating unprecedented levels of punishments for violators now (players such as Schumaker and Detroit’s Max Scherzer publicly called for lifetime bans for first-time offenders), today’s players are essentially repudiating those attitudes so prevalent as recently as six years ago and during the height of the steroid era. But as a consequence, they might be exposing themselves to fragmentations that could shift the balance of power in baseball’s labor relationship in the favor of ownership. Biogenesis has inflamed the MLBPA’s membership. But in pushing for increased sanctions for PED use, players might be weakening their union’s longstanding position as the strongest negotiating body in the history of professional team sports.

It’s an interesting question, but I don’t think the union’s overall strength and solidarity is at risk.

Jonah Keri and I touched on this a bit on his podcast the other day, but my view is that there is a pretty clear delineation between PED issues and general pocketbook issues with which the union is normally concerned. There’s no reason why, on the one hand, the union can’t agree to stiffer PED penalties and begin to turn heavily on those among them who still cheat while still providing a unified front if the owners decided to, say, try to roll back the gains players have made in terms of salary, free agency and the like. There just isn’t some link between those issues and drug issues that necessitates a fissure on the part of the union in both instances.

Indeed, one could argue that the players’ solidarity regarding PED testing is a sign of health, not weakness of the union.  I’m put in mind of the United Auto Workers union in my hometown of Flint, Michigan. They became strong through solidarity and will. Then they spent decades getting everything they wanted. Then they, depending on who you talk to, either overreached tremendously and/or got stuck in a mindset where management’s views were never taken seriously and compromise, when it became necessary, wasn’t considered. Or, at the very least, was considered too late. Obviously there was a lot more going on with that and no sane view of the U.S. auto industry should absolve management completely, but it’s hard to walk away from that thinking that better outcomes wouldn’t have been realized if the union were more pragmatic. Solidarity is a huge part of a union’s power, but there comes a point where solidarity for its own sake is a weakness, not a strength.

I see the MLBPA as being pragmatic here. Their defense of A-Rod in the face of disproportionate punishment shows that they’re not throwing players under the bus, but the shifting views Bryant describes are setting the stage for them to agree to changes in the Joint Drug Agreement that pleases its membership. Still: despite all the tough talk now, I think it’s highly unlikely that they’d surrender their rights in a wholesale fashion in any changes to the JDA. When asked if Ryan Braun should be squashed, it’s an understandable emotional reaction to say “hell yeah!” When they sit down at a table and hypothetical changes are proposed that could squash any player, they may not be so quick to agree.

But no matter what happens with baseball’s drug rules, if Bud Selig tied to exploit this seeming softening of the union to, say, eliminate guaranteed contracts altogether or something, he would face fierce opposition. It’d be like 1994 all over again. Why? Because the union isn’t dumb and is fully capable of treating two different issues in two different ways. To the extent the owners and Selig misperceive this and attempt to exploit what they believe to be the union’s weakness, they will be in for a very rude awakening.

Miami Police Department considers Yasiel Puig case closed

Los Angeles Dodgers' Yasiel Puig waits to bat during batting practice prior to a baseball game against the Oakland Athletics, Wednesday, July 29, 2015, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)
AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill
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We have more details about Yasiel Puig‘s reported “brawl” at a bar in Miami. And while it’s a regrettable situation, it appears to be less serious than previously believed.

According to Dylan Hernandez of the Los Angeles Times, Major Delrish Moss of the Miami Police Department confirmed that Puig was involved in a fight with a bouncer. However, Moss described it more as a “scuffle” than a “brawl.” The Dodgers outfielder suffered injuries to his face, including a swollen left eye, while the bouncer was left with a “busted lip” among other minor facial injuries.

While the bouncer alleged that he was sucker-punched by Puig, Moss said that neither were interested in pressing charges. As a result, the Miami Police Department considers the case closed.

TMZ reported that the fight with the bouncer took place after Puig got into a physical altercation with his sister. However, Moss said that “no shoving was alleged” and that “to the best of our knowledge, the only physical altercation was between the bouncer and Puig.”

Major League Baseball is still expected to investigate the incident under their new domestic violence policy.

Erik Johnson likely to open 2016 in the White Sox rotation

DENVER, CO - APRIL 09:  Starting pitcher Erik Johnson #45 of the Chicago White Sox delivers against the Colorado Rockies during Interleague play at Coors Field on April 9, 2014 in Denver, Colorado. The Rockies defeated the White Sox 10-4.  (Photo by Doug Pensinger/Getty Images)
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With the White Sox losing Jeff Samardzija to free agency, Erik Johnson will likely get a shot to contribute out of the rotation to open up the 2016 season, GM Rick Hahn said in a conference call on Wednesday, per a report from’s Scott Merkin.

“As we sit here today, I think it will be an opportunity for Erik Johnson to convert on sort of the return to form he showed back in 2015 when he was International League pitcher of the year for [Triple-A] Charlotte,” Hahn said. “Obviously, he got some starts in September and continued to show the progress in Chicago he had shown in the Minor Leagues over the course of the last season.

“So if Opening Day were today, then I think Johnson is penciled in to that spot in the rotation right now. In all probability, once we get closer to spring, there will be some competition for him to earn that spot. But if we were strictly looking at today, then I would think Johnson has the inside track on filling Samardzija’s innings.”

Johnson was called up from Triple-A Charlotte in September and made six starts, allowing 14 runs (13 earned) on 32 hits and 17 walks with 30 strikeouts in 35 innings. That followed up an impressive five months in the minors where he compiled a 2.37 ERA and a 136/41 K/BB ratio across 132 2/3 innings.

Baseball America, Baseball Prospectus, and each included Johnson on their top-100 prospect lists, ranking him 63rd, 67th, and 70th, respectively. The right-hander was selected by the White Sox in the second round of the 2011 draft.

Major League Baseball will investigate Yasiel Puig for his role in Miami nightclub brawl

Yasiel Puig
AP Photo/Lenny Ignelzi

It was reported on Friday afternoon that Dodgers outfielder Yasiel Puig was involved in a brawl at a Miami nightclub. Details were scant at the time, but he reportedly left with a bruise on his face.

Dylan Hernandez of the Los Angeles Times reports that Major League Baseball plans to investigate Puig under the league’s new domestic violence policy for his role in the brawl. Citing a report from TMZ, Hernandez notes that Puig shoved his sister, “brutally sucker-punched” the manager of the bar, and instigated the brawl.

The Dodgers and Puig’s agent have thus far refused to comment on the situation.

Rockies shortstop Jose Reyes was the first player to be investigated under the league’s new domestic violence policy earlier this month, as he allegedly assaulted his wife. Reyes has pleaded not guilty after he was charged with domestic abuse in Hawaii.

As our own Craig Calcaterra pointed out, commissioner Rob Manfred does not need to wait for Puig to plead guilty or to be found guilty to levy a punishment.

Dayan Viciedo close to signing with Japan’s Chunichi Dragons

Dayan Viciedo
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Patrick Newman is reporting that the Chunichi Dragons of Japan’s Nippon Professional Baseball and outfielder Dayan Viciedo are close to an agreement on a contract. Newman notes that the Dragons are close to signing pitcher Jordan Norberto as well.

Viciedo, 26, has struggled since making his major league debut in 2010 with the White Sox, batting an aggregate .254/.298/.424 with 66 home runs and 211 RBI in 1,798 plate appearances. He spent the 2015 season with Triple-A Charlotte (White Sox) and Nashville (Athletics), hitting a composite .287/.348/.450. While Viciedo can hit the occasional home run, he hasn’t shown the ability to do much else at the big league level. Given his age, he could prove himself in Japan and parlay that into a renewed shot in the majors in the future.

The White Sox signed Viciedo out of Cuba in December 2008, agreeing to a four-year, $10 million deal. The club re-signed him to one-year deals in 2013 and ’14 for $2.8 million each and $4.4 million ahead of the 2015 season.