This is a pretty major week in PEDs history — but not just for the Biogenesis stuff

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Today Alex Rodriguez and others are going to get nailed for their involvement in the Biogenesis stuff, but that’s only one of three major PED-related moments in baseball history to celebrate this week:

On August 7, 2002, Major leaguers agreed to be checked randomly for illegal steroids for the first time. The testing would begin the following year and there would be no discipline associated with it unless and until the trial tests showed that a certain percentage of players were using (note: they did). There wasn’t a ton of news about this at the time as the agreement came at the same time the union and the league averted a work stoppage borne mostly of disagreements over financial issues, contraction and the like. But given that Ken Caminiti and Jose Canseco had begun giving interviews about rampant PED-use in baseball earlier in the season, it was a PR point the league and the players agreed needed to be made.
Also on August 7 — this time in 2007 — Barry Bonds surpassed Hank Aaron as the all-time home run leader when he connected on a 3-2 pitch for homer number 756 off Mike Bacsik of the Nationals. We all like to think of that as some dark, dark event in baseball history, as the already-compromised Barry Bonds was seen as sullying the home run record which rightfully belonged to Aaron. But when we look at it that we forget that Bonds received a 10-minute ovation from his hometown fans and, more significantly, a video message was played on the scoreboard in which Hammerin’ Hank Aaron himself congratulated Bonds for breaking the record.
It’s kinda nice that the first week in August has a lot PED history associated with it. We can make a big celebration and holiday out of it.

Danny Farquhar taken to hospital after fainting in dugout

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White Sox reliever Danny Farquhar passed out in the dugout after completing his outing against the Astros on Friday evening. The cause of the incident has yet to be determined, but Farquhar was supervised by the club’s medical personnel and EMTs and regained consciousness before being taken to Rush University Medical Center for further treatment and testing. A diagnosis has not been announced by the team.

Farquhar pitched 2/3 of an inning in relief during Friday’s 10-0 loss to Houston. He was brought in to relieve James Shields in the top of the sixth inning and was immediately bested by George Springer, who belted a ground-rule double down the right field line and scored Brian McCann and Derek Fisher for the Astros’ sixth and seventh runs of the night. He recovered to strike out Jose Altuve, but was again punished with a two-run homer from Carlos Correa (his first of two), and induced a fly out to end the inning.

The 31-year-old righty pitched just 7 1/3 innings with the club prior to Friday’s performance, issuing four hits, three runs, two homers and eight strikeouts in seven appearances.