This is a pretty major week in PEDs history — but not just for the Biogenesis stuff

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Today Alex Rodriguez and others are going to get nailed for their involvement in the Biogenesis stuff, but that’s only one of three major PED-related moments in baseball history to celebrate this week:

On August 7, 2002, Major leaguers agreed to be checked randomly for illegal steroids for the first time. The testing would begin the following year and there would be no discipline associated with it unless and until the trial tests showed that a certain percentage of players were using (note: they did). There wasn’t a ton of news about this at the time as the agreement came at the same time the union and the league averted a work stoppage borne mostly of disagreements over financial issues, contraction and the like. But given that Ken Caminiti and Jose Canseco had begun giving interviews about rampant PED-use in baseball earlier in the season, it was a PR point the league and the players agreed needed to be made.
Also on August 7 — this time in 2007 — Barry Bonds surpassed Hank Aaron as the all-time home run leader when he connected on a 3-2 pitch for homer number 756 off Mike Bacsik of the Nationals. We all like to think of that as some dark, dark event in baseball history, as the already-compromised Barry Bonds was seen as sullying the home run record which rightfully belonged to Aaron. But when we look at it that we forget that Bonds received a 10-minute ovation from his hometown fans and, more significantly, a video message was played on the scoreboard in which Hammerin’ Hank Aaron himself congratulated Bonds for breaking the record.
It’s kinda nice that the first week in August has a lot PED history associated with it. We can make a big celebration and holiday out of it.

Clayton Kershaw struggles with control, walks six Marlins

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Dodgers ace Clayton Kershaw entered Wednesday night’s start against the Marlins without having issued a walk in his previous three starts. In fact, his last walk came on April 3 when he issued a free pass to Paul Goldschmidt with the bases empty and two outs in the bottom of the first inning. All told, Kershaw was on a streak of 26 walk-less innings before he took the mound at home to take on the Marlins.

Kershaw started off Wednesday in character, striking out the side in the first inning. He issued a walk in a tough second inning, but escaped without allowing a run. Kershaw walked two more in the third and again danced out of danger. In the fourth, Kershaw walked Lewis Brinson to load the bases with no outs and — you guessed it — didn’t end up allowing a run. His errant control finally came back to bite him in the fifth when Kershaw issued back-to-back two-out walks, then served up a three-run home run to Miguel Rojas down the left field line. His night was done when he completed the inning. Five innings, three runs, five hits, six walks, seven strikeouts, 112 pitches.

The six walks Kershaw issued over five innings marked his first six-walk outing since April 7, 2010 when he issued six free passes to the Pirates in 4 2/3 innings. The only other time he walked as many was on August 3, 2009 against the Brewers in a four-plus inning outing. Kershaw hasn’t even walked five batters in an outing recently — the last time was September 23, 2012 against the Reds.