Four Biogenesis minor leaguers to remain suspended into 2014

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Part of the rush to get the Biogenesis suspensions announced now was to allow major leaguers could finish their bans this year (and thus not appeal said bans). Things won’t go so smoothly for minor leaguers, though. Of the 13 players about to be suspended by Major League Baseball, four are not on 40-man rosters and will have to continue serving out their suspensions next year, a source familiar with the investigation told NBCSports.com’s Craig Calcaterra . Those four are:

Astros reliever Sergio Escalona
Yankees outfielder Fernando Martinez
Padres reliever Fautino De Los Santos
Free agent reliever Jordan Norberto

Jesus Montero of the Mariners and Cesar Puello and Jordany Valdespin of the Mets are also currently in the minors, but since they’re on 40-man rosters, they’re treated as major leaguers, meaning all three will be allowed to finish out their suspensions this year.

There are currently about 28-29 minor league games remaining in the season. Any playoff games will also likely count towards the 50, but Escalona, Martinez and De Los Santos will be prevented from playing for the first weeks of 2014.

All four players have major league experience. Escalona, who has been hurt this year, had allowed 11 runs in 15 innings for Double-A Corpus Christi. Martinez, who is always hurt, was at .325/.394/.554 with four homers in 83 at-bats for Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre after signing on with the Yankees in June. De Los Santos did his best work for the A’s in 2011. He’s pitched just 2 1/3 innings in the Padres system this year.

It remains to be seen whether the league will give any special consideration to Norberto, who can’t actually serve his suspension while unemployed and who isn’t likely to receive much interest with the suspension hanging over his head. Norberto had a 2.77 ERA in 52 innings for the A’s last year before falling apart this spring and getting hurt. He was released earlier this year.

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Update: Puello was incorrectly listed as being in with the group of minor leaguers. He’s a member of the Mets’ 40-man roster and will be allowed to complete his suspension this year.

De Los Santos’ status as a Padres minor leaguer has been corrected. He was released by the team earlier this season (and mistakenly listed as a free agent here), but he was re-signed to a minor league contract.

Nationals owner Mark Lerner had his left leg amputated

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Mark Lerner, son of Ted Lerner and a co-owner of the Washington Nationals, had his left leg amputated earlier this month. He was diagnosed earlier this year for a rare form of cancer that a attacks connective tissue and treatment had been ineffective, so doctors removed the limb.

The news was revealed in the form of a letter Lerner wrote to Washington Post columnist Barry Svrluga, who had inquired about Lerner’s uncharacteristic absence from the ballpark of late. Lerner:

“With my doctors and medical team, we decided that amputation of that leg was my best choice to maintain the active and busy lifestyle that I have always enjoyed. The limb was removed in early August and I’m healing well, cancer-free, and looking forward to my eventual new prosthetic.”

Lerner, 63, has been known to dress up in a Nats uniform and shag fly balls with the team during batting practice. Here’s hoping for a speedy recovery and, if his prosthetic allows, some more BP shagging at some point in the future.

New Marlins owners are going to dump David Samson, keep the home run sculpture

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The Miami Herald reports that the future Miami Marlins owners, Bruce Sherman and Derek Jeter, have informed Major League Baseball that they do not intend to retain current team president David Samson. Derek Jeter will replace him as the person in charge of baseball and business operations.

Samson has been a polarizing figure in Miami and has been seen as Jeff Loria’s front-facing presence in many ways. He led the effort for the team to get its new stadium, which led to political scandal and outrage in Miami (not that he didn’t get his stadium). In 2014, he appeared on “Survivor.” He did not survive.

What will survive, however, is the famous home run sculpture in the outfield at Marlins Park. You’ll recall some reports earlier this week that Sherman and Jeter were thinking about removing it. If so, they’ll have a lot of hurdles to jump, because yesterday the Miami-Dade County government reminded them that it was paid for by its Art in Public Places program, it is thus owned by the county and that it cannot be moved without prior approval from the county.

I know a lot of people hate that thing, but it has grown on me over the years. Not for its own aesthetic sake as much for its uniqueness and whimsy, which are two things that are in extraordinarily short supply across the Major League Baseball landscape. Like a lot of new and different bits of art and architecture over the course of history, I suspect its initial loathing will increasingly come to be replaced by respect and even pride. Especially if the Marlins ever make another World Series run, in which case everything associated with the club will be elevated in the eyes of fans.

On this score, Sherman and Jeter will thank Miami-Dade for saving themselves from themselves one day.