New York Yankees Alex Rodriguez speaks during a news conference in Chicago

Alex Rodriguez: “I’m fighting for my life”

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On the heels of MLB announcing a 211-game suspension earlier this afternoon, Alex Rodriguez held a press conference this evening at U.S. Cellular Field in Chicago. If you were looking for any major revelations in regard to his alleged PED use and Biogenesis, you were probably disappointed. Not surprisingly, he declined to discuss any of the details. However, he did have some interesting things to say.

Rodriguez began the press conference with some brief opening remarks, during which he expressed his relief to be back in a Yankees uniform, not only after the Biogenesis investigation but also a tough rehab process following hip surgery in January.

“The last seven months have been a nightmare. Probably the worst time of my life, for sure. Obviously for the circumstances that are at hand and also dealing with a tough surgery and rehab program and being 38. I am thrilled and humbled to have the opportunity to put on this uniform again and play major league baseball again. I feel like I was 18 years old back in Fenway Park in 1994 when I went in to face the Red Sox for the very first time. It’s been 20 years. And I’m just very excited for the opportunity to go out there and play baseball and help my team win. And prove to myself, my teammates, the fans of New York, the fans of baseball, that I still have the shot to play the game at a high level and I’m going to give it my best.”

On why he has decided to appeal his suspension 211-game suspension from MLB:

“I’m fighting for my life, I have to defend myself. If I don’t defend myself, no one else will.”

When asked directly whether he used PEDs:

“We’ll have a forum to discuss all that and we’ll talk about that then.”

On whether he would drop his appeal after seeing what evidence MLB has against him:

“We’ve seen everything. There will be a time and place for everything. When the time is right we’ll all speak more freely.”

On what it feels like to get back on the field:

“For me, it’s going to be business as usual. I’ve got a job to do.”

When asked whether he thinks the Yankees want him back:

“If I’m productive, I think they want me back.”

Rodriguez got off to a good start, singling in his first at bat of 2013 as boos came from the stands.

Here’s video from the press conference:

The allegations against Rodriguez and others were first revealed in late January, when the Miami New Times published a report that connected them to Bosch and his clinic. Bosch reportedly provided a group of MLB players with human growth hormone and steroids as early as December 2011. The New Times story, along with reports by Yahoo! Sports and ESPN, reportedly spurred MLB’s investigation.

“Despite the challenges this situation has created during a great season on the field, we pursued this matter because it was not only the right thing to do, but the only thing to do,” Selig said.

Bosch faces a federal inquiry into whether Biogenesis illegally distributed steroids to high school students and major leaguers, according to reports by ESPN and the Miami Herald. Bosch’s lawyer, Susy Ribero-Ayala, has not responded to messages left by NBC Sports.

The matter reportedly is being handled by Jeff Novitzky, the federal agent who directed investigations of BALCO, a clinic in the Bay Area that was found to have distributed steroids to athletes.

Rodriguez, 38, is fifth on MLB’s career home run list, with 647 spread over two decades with three teams. Barry Bonds holds the record, with 762, but many fans believe that mark to be illegitimate because of Bonds’ tie to BALCO.

Rodriguez admitted in 2009 that he used steroids for three years, from 2001-03, while he was a member of the Texas Rangers. His name also appeared on a list of 104 players who tested positive for PEDs in a 2003 MLB survey, according to a report by Sports Illustrated.

The survey, which was confidential, reportedly was done to measure the extent of baseball’s problem with performance-enhancing drugs, not to determine who was actually using them. So Rodriguez’s alleged positive test could not have resulted in punishment.

Rodriguez has yet to play this year after undergoing arthroscopic surgery on his left hip in January. His recovery efforts stalled in mid-July, when he strained his left quadriceps. Rodriguez claimed he was ready to return. The Yankees said he was not.

Rodriguez sought a second opinion from a New Jersey doctor, who examined an MRI of the slugger’s leg and proclaimed him fit both over the telephone and in a subsequent media blitz. The Yankees were displeased that Rodriguez sought a second opinion without informing them in writing first, according to ESPN.

The Phillies have shut down Jake Thompson

CLEARWATER, FL - MARCH 03:  Jake Thompson #75 of the Philadelphia Phillies throws a pitch during the first inning of a spring training game against the Houston Astros at Bright House Field on March 3, 2016 in Clearwater, Florida.  (Photo by Stacy Revere/Getty Images)
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Phillies rookie starter Jake Thompson has been shut down for the year. Not that there’s much of the year left, but he will not make what would’ve been his last start.

Thompson allowed three earned runs over four innings in the Phillies’ 17-0 blowout loss to the Mets. That leaves him with a 5.70 ERA in 53.2 innings for the season. Which, while that’s kind of ugly, it was a function of some bad starts mixed in with good starts as opposed to overall badness.

Everything about his 2016 should be viewed as “get yourself used to the big leagues, because you’re going to be part of this rotation in 2017 and beyond,” and from that perspective, you can call 2016 a success.

Congressional candidate uses Jose Fernandez’s death to score political points

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As a horrible Sunday unfolded yesterday there was at least one thing buoying the public mood: the overwhelming outpouring of emotion and love for Jose Fernandez and warm remembrances of his all-too-brief time on Earth.

But it wasn’t a unanimous sentiment. Some people, like this Florida state representative who is currently running for Congress, thought it was a great time to make a political point:

Setting aside the tastelessness of Gaetz’s timing and intent, one wonders if he appreciates that the reason Fernandez risked his life on multiple occasions was specifically so he could live in a country where protesting and not exhibiting a reflexive loyalty and patriotism is a fundamental right and does not get you thrown in jail.

But really, it’s the tastelessness which most galls here.