Sources: Alex Rodriguez to be suspended for 2013, 2014 seasons

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If Major League Baseball has its way, Alex Rodriguez won’t play again until the 2015 season.

Sources tell NBCSports.com that MLB plans to suspend Rodriguez for the remainder of the 2013 season and the entire 2014 campaign.

That’s better than the lifetime suspension that MLB was originally shooting for with its evidence that Rodriguez has used PEDs since the 2009 season. It’d also have a better chance of holding up in arbitration than the lifetime ban. Still, with Rodriguez prepared to fight, the league could have its hands full in a court case. Its top source for information, Biogenesis owner Anthony Bosch, is a liar and is the subject of a federal investigation, and a Rodriguez lawsuit could require the league to release information it’d much rather keep private.

Hopeful of returning to the Yankees lineup this week, Rodriguez, who had offseason hip surgery, homered Friday in a rehab game for Double-A Trenton and walked four times Saturday. He told reporters after Saturday’s game that he plans to be with the Yankees when they play in Chicago on Monday.

“We’re going to have a workout (Sunday) and then fly to Chicago,” Rodriguez said, per the Associated Press. “I’ve been on the field for the last five and a half hours. I haven’t heard anything or seen anything.”

MLB, though, plans to announce its suspension of Rodriguez on Monday and prevent him from playing during the appeal process by using the in-the-best-interests-of-baseball clause that commissioner Bud Selig holds.

The league is also expected to announce several other suspensions Monday, with Rangers outfielder Nelson Cruz, Tigers shortstop Jhonny Peralta and Padres shortstop Everth Cabera likely facing bans of at least 50 games.

Report: Mets ownership backs Terry Collins

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The Mets entered Sunday night’s game against the Pirates with a disappointing 20-27 record. While the club has dealt with a litany of injuries, manager Terry Collins has also drawn criticism for in-game decision-making, particularly regarding his decision-making.

Owner Fred Wilpon is still Collins’ strongest supporter, however, Newsday’s Marc Carig reports. As a result, the team is unlikely to make a managerial change anytime soon. If the Mets continue to struggle, though, ownership may feel pressured to make a change.

Collins became the longest-tenured manager in Mets history last week. Collins managed the Mets to a 77-85 record in 2011 and has overall helped the club go 501-518, winning the NL Pennant in 2015. He is not signed to a contract beyond this season.

Joe Mauer becomes first Twin to reach base seven times in a game since Rod Carew

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Twins first baseman Joe Mauer had a game for the record books on Sunday against the Rays. He finished 4-for-5 with an RBI double, a solo home run, two singles, and three walks in eight plate appearances. Unfortunately for him, the Twins still lost 8-6 in 15 innings.

ESPN’s Stats & Info notes that Mauer is the first Twin to reach base seven times in one game since Rod Carew in 1972 against the Brewers. The last player to reach base seven times in one game (without the aid of an error) was Giants shortstop Brandon Crawford on August 8 last season against the Marlins. The feat has only been accomplished seven times this decade, so about once a year.

After Sunday’s game, Mauer is batting .283/.363/.408 with three home runs, 18 RBI, and 23 runs scored in 171 plate appearances. Not too shabby.