Chris Johnson sets Braves record with eighth consecutive multi-hit game

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Braves third baseman Chris Johnson went 2-for-4 with a double and a home run in the Braves’ 6-4 victory over the Phillies tonight, marking the eighth consecutive game in which he has had two or more hits. MLB.com’s Mark Bowman confirms that it is a team record since the Braves moved to Atlanta in 1966. Johnson entered the night leading the National League in batting average at .346. Tonight’s performance bumped it up to .347.

An obscenely high batting average on balls in play has been the backbone of his offensive success this season. It stands at .430, 38 points above the next-highest BABIP (Joe Mauer, .392) and 65 points above his career average. Per ESPN’s Jayson Stark, if the .430 BABIP holds, it would be the highest mark since Ty Cobb and Shoeless Joe Jackson in 1911. According to Baseball Reference, there have been 27 instances of a .400+ BABIP among hitters that had enough plate appearances to qualify for the batting title. The most recent was accomplished by Jose Hernandez in 2002, but he struck out so often (a league-leading 188 times) he didn’t put the ball in play all that often — his overall batting average was .288.

The full list (bolded averages indicate a league-leader):

Player Year BAbip Age Tm BA
Chris Johnson 2013 .430 28 ATL .346
Jose Hernandez 2002 .404 32 MIL .288
Manny Ramirez 2000 .403 28 CLE .351
Rod Carew 1977 .408 31 MIN .388
Roberto Clemente 1967 .403 32 PIT .357
Luke Appling 1936 .400 29 CHW .388
Bill Terry 1930 .400 31 NYG .401
Rogers Hornsby 1924 .422 28 STL .424
Babe Ruth 1923 .423 28 NYY .393
Harry Heilmann 1923 .414 28 DET .403
George Sisler 1922 .422 29 SLB .420
Ty Cobb 1922 .416 35 DET .401
Rogers Hornsby 1921 .409 25 STL .397
George Sisler 1920 .401 27 SLB .407
Ty Cobb 1919 .401 32 DET .384
Ty Cobb 1917 .400 30 DET .383
Benny Kauff 1914 .400 24 IND .370
Ty Cobb 1913 .415 26 DET .390
Ty Cobb 1912 .424 25 DET .409
Shoeless Joe Jackson 1912 .405 24 CLE .395
Heinie Zimmerman 1912 .400 25 CHC .372
Shoeless Joe Jackson 1911 .434 23 CLE .408
Ty Cobb 1911 .444 24 DET .420
Ty Cobb 1910 .412 23 DET .383
George Stone 1906 .416 29 SLB .358
Nap Lajoie 1901 .418 26 PHA .426
Jesse Burkett 1901 .415 32 STL .376
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
Generated 8/2/2013.

Max Scherzer will not be ready for Opening Day

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Ten days ago Nationals ace Max Scherzer said he’d be ready for the start of the regular season. “I’m gonna do it,” Scherzer said.

[Ron Howard from “Arrested Development” voice] — No, he’s not:

Nationals manager Dusty Baker said that Max Scherzer is not on track to be the team’s opening day starter, and will most likely open the season as the third pitcher in the rotation.

He’s still projected to make it to the opening rotation, taking the hill, most likely, on Thursday April 6 against the Marlins. At least if the schedule doesn’t slip any more.

Scherzer, as you probably know, has a stress fracture in the knuckle of his right ring finger, which has messed with his preparation and has caused him to alter his grip a bit. As of now Stephen Strasburg will get the Opening Day nod.

Theo Epstein named The World’s Greatest Leader

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Fortune Magazine has put out a list of The World’s Greatest Leaders. Not the greatest business leaders, not the greatest leaders in a given industry, but the Greatest Leaders, full stop. The greatest according to Fortune: The Cubs’ Theo Epstein.

For some context, Pope Francis was third. Angela Merkel was 10th. Lebron James was the next greatest sports leader, ranked 11th. Take Fortune’s methodology with a grain of salt, however, given that it has John McCain above Merkel — what, exactly, does he lead now? — and Samantha Bee in the top 20.

So what makes Theo the world’s best leader according to Fortune?

The Cubs owe their success to a five-year rebuilding program that featured a concatenation of different leadership styles. The team thrived under the affable patience of owner Tom Ricketts, and, later, under the innovative eccentricity of manager Joe Maddon. But most important of all was the evolution of the club’s president for baseball operations, Theo Epstein, the wunderkind executive who realized he would need to grow as a leader in order to replicate in Chicago the success he’d had with the Boston Red Sox.

I don’t want to take anything away from what Theo has done — he’s a Hall of Fame executive already in my view — but I feel like maybe one needs to adjust for the fact that this is a baseball team we’re talking about. They’re the whole world to us and their brands are nationally and even world famous, but as an organization, sports teams are rather small. There are guys who run reasonably-sized HVAC companies with more employees than a baseball team and they don’t get the benefit of an antitrust exemption and a rule which allows them to get their pick of the best new employees if they had a bad year the year before.

Really, not trying to throw shade here, just thinking that being the spiritual father for 1.2 billion Catholics or running a foundation that serves 55 million needy children — like the woman who comes in at number 14 — is a bit of a tougher trick.

But this will make a great framed magazine article on Theo’s wall in Wrigley Field.