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Tony Bosch may not be well advised to testify in Biogenesis appeals

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This morning I linked a story about the feds taking an interest in Biogenesis and investigating whether or not it sold drugs to high schoolers and things.  The Daily News has a more thorough story about it here.

I hadn’t thought of this before — my lawyer skills are atrophied, it seems — but a friend of mine just pointed out that this set of circumstances could possibly present a problem for Major League Baseball.

The problem: as a target of a federal investigation, Bosch would be well-advised to clam the heck up. If he testifies or speaks anywhere, his comments will be used against him in any subsequent criminal proceedings. That includes if he speaks at, say, an arbitration following a ballplayer’s appeal of a Major League Baseball suspension. If Bosch has a good lawyer, that lawyer is telling him NOT to go on the record anyplace if he fears federal prosecution. Especially given that his testimony at an MLB arbitration would be all about how he sold drugs to people.

Now, this doesn’t necessarily create a huge problem. For one thing, Bosch’s former employee, Porter Fischer is both cooperating with the feds and Major League Baseball. It could very well be that baseball is relying way more on him than Bosch and that his testimony would be sufficient. It’s also possible that Bosch himself is under no illusions that he’s going to escape federal pain and could very well make a deal with the feds in time to help baseball if they need his testimony to sustain player discipline.

But it is an interesting wrinkle. One that, if you were a lawyer for a player trying to decide whether or not to appeal Biogenesis discipline, could certainly impact your thinking on the matter.

Report: Brewers to sign Joba Chamberlain

BOSTON, MA - MAY 21:  Joba Chamberlain #62 of the Cleveland Indians reacts after giving up a grand slam to Mookie Betts #50 of the Boston Red Sox in the seventh inning during the game at Fenway Park on May 21, 2016 in Boston, Massachusetts.  (Photo by Adam Glanzman/Getty Images)
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According to FanRag Sports’ Jon Heyman, free agent reliever Joba Chamberlain has a deal with the Brewers. No confirmation or terms of the contract have been confirmed by the team yet.

Chamberlain, 31, had a promising resurgence in the Indians’ bullpen during 2016. He shaved his ERA down to a modest 2.25 mark over 20 innings with Cleveland, paired with an 8.1 SO/9 and less-than-stellar 5.0 BB/9 rate. Over a decade in the major leagues, the right-hander holds a career 3.81 ERA, 8.8 SO/9 and 3.7 BB/9 rate.

The veteran righty was released by the Indians in July after refusing re-assignment. He’s expected to compete for a major league role this spring.

Athletics sign Santiago Casilla to two-year, $11 million deal

MIAMI, FL - AUGUST 10: Santiago Casilla #46 of the San Francisco Giants throws a pitch during the 9th inning against the Miami Marlins at Marlins Park on August 10, 2016 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Eric Espada/Getty Images)
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After letting rumors of the deal percolate for the last week, the Athletics officially announced their two-year, $11 million contract with right-hander Santiago Casilla on Friday (and threw a little bit of shade at the Giants, too). As previously reported, the contract includes an extra $3 million in performance bonuses.

Casilla, 36, got his major league start with Oakland back in 2004, racking up a 5.11 ERA and four saves over six seasons in the A’s bullpen. After picking up a minor league deal with the Giants in 2010, the righty flitted in and out of the closing role with varying degrees of success. Notwithstanding a slight downturn in his production rate during the 2016 season, he earned 123 saves and a 2.42 ERA during the past seven years in San Francisco. Securing another closing role might be a little tougher across the Bay, however, with a bullpen that includes fellow closers Ryan Madson, Ryan Dull and Sean Doolittle.