Albert Pujols AP

Albert Pujols won’t require surgery on foot, still hopes to return this season


Albert Pujols landed on the disabled list over the weekend due to a partial tear of the left plantar fascia, but he’s still hoping to make it back this season.

According to Alden Gonzalez of, Pujols said this evening that he will not require surgery on his foot since the tear naturally accomplished what surgery would have done. He expects to shed a walking boot in three weeks and hopes to begin working his way back to the Angels from there.

“I’ll see how I feel [after three weeks],” Pujols said. “But it’s still a long way until the season is done, so I don’t want to say that I’m done for the season. This is something that I’m going to take day-by-day. The way I feel right now, with no pain, I can say that I can go out there and play. But I need to put that weight on my heel and that’s going to take some time. I feel really good, to tell you the truth. I don’t feel any pain at all. I think after that tear, it kind of released the pain, which is good.”

Pujols said he was playing at “45 percent” this year while dealing with the nagging foot injury, so he thinks he can help even if he’s at “55 percent,” but there’s little sense of urgency for him to rush back for the final days of a lost season. The Angels will enter play tonight on a six-game losing streak and sit at 46-56 on the year.

Pujols, 33, is batting .258/.330/.437 with 17 home runs and 64 RBI in 99 games this season. He still has another eight years remaining on his 10-year, $240 million contract with the Angels.

Wild Card, Division series umpires announced

Angel Hernandez
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Major League Baseball just released the umpire assignments for the Wild Card Game and the Division Series. As always, the basis for these assignments is a proprietary, scientific calculation undertaken by Major League Baseball, mixing in (a) skill; (b) seniority; and (c) trolling of baseball bloggers who, unlike 99% of the rest of the world actually know the names and track records of various umpires and who are easily riled.

Which is to say that, while we have no Joe West in the early playoff rounds this year — too obvious, perhaps? — we do get an Angel Hernandez.

Here are the assignments. The asterisks represent the crew chief of each unit. Guys with little up arrows next to their names are regular season crew chiefs in their own right. Print this out and keep it near your television so you know who to yell about before the broadcasters tell you who to yell at:

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Which teams improved and declined the most in 2015?

Joe Maddon

I was curious about which MLB teams changed their fortunes the most this season compared to last year, so I crunched the numbers.

First, here are the biggest win total improvements from 2014 to 2015:

+24 Cubs
+21 Rangers
+16 Astros
+15 Diamondbacks
+13 Twins
+11 Mets
+10 Blue Jays
+10 Cardinals
+10 Pirates

The top five teams on the biggest-improvement list all had managers in their first season on the job, led by Joe Maddon joining the Cubs after tons of success with the Rays. Also worth noting: Of the nine teams with the biggest win total improvement, eight made the playoffs. Only the Twins improved to double-digit games and still failed to make the playoffs.

Now, here are the biggest win total declines from 2014 to 2015:

-20 Athletics
-16 Tigers
-15 Orioles
-14 Brewers
-13 Nationals
-13 Angels
-12 Braves
-12 Reds
-11 Mariners

Not surprisingly, a whole lot of those teams have changed managers, general managers, or both. And a couple more may still do so before the offseason gets underway. Oakland retained manager Bob Melvin despite an MLB-high 20-win dropoff and just promoted Billy Beane from general manager to vice president of baseball operations.