How is baseball counting A-Rod’s violations, anyway?

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If A-Rod gets major discipline, it’s going to be because he’s seen as being a multiple-time violator of the drug agreement. Bill Madden of the Daily News was on the Boomer and Carton show today and he was asked what those multiple violations might look like. Here’s Madden:

“We are talking here (about) non-analytical violations, i.e. in absence of a positive drug test,” he said. “OK? Now, let’s just say for example, they have proof — good proof, legitimate proof, records, whatever — that Alex Rodriguez sought to buy drugs. That’s a violation. Now they have proof that Alex Rodriguez actually bought drugs. That’s a violation. Now they have proof that Alex Rodriguez was administered drugs. That’s a third violation.”

Um. OK.

Of course if that were the case every single player who ever tested positive for PEDs would be subject to triple discipline. Because to do that you have to first “seek to buy drugs” then you have to buy drugs then you have to take drugs.  I mean, that’s 100% unavoidable, yes?

I realize Bill Madden is not in charge of the discipline process, but he certainly has sources in MLB who are informing him of the thought process involved with the Biogenesis case. And this is what is passing for logic and justice with respect to A-Rod. We are in a world gone mad. Although, if you think about it, we could use this logic to shorten games:

[Batter at plates, Ump looks in. Batter swings and misses.]

Umpire: “Strike one-two-three, you’re out!!”

Player: “What?!”

Ump: “You thought about swinging, you swung, you missed! You’re out!”

[everyone nods and smiles at how nice it is that umpires are getting tough on batters]

Clayton Kershaw struggles with control, walks six Marlins

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Dodgers ace Clayton Kershaw entered Wednesday night’s start against the Marlins without having issued a walk in his previous three starts. In fact, his last walk came on April 3 when he issued a free pass to Paul Goldschmidt with the bases empty and two outs in the bottom of the first inning. All told, Kershaw was on a streak of 26 walk-less innings before he took the mound at home to take on the Marlins.

Kershaw started off Wednesday in character, striking out the side in the first inning. He issued a walk in a tough second inning, but escaped without allowing a run. Kershaw walked two more in the third and again danced out of danger. In the fourth, Kershaw walked Lewis Brinson to load the bases with no outs and — you guessed it — didn’t end up allowing a run. His errant control finally came back to bite him in the fifth when Kershaw issued back-to-back two-out walks, then served up a three-run home run to Miguel Rojas down the left field line. His night was done when he completed the inning. Five innings, three runs, five hits, six walks, seven strikeouts, 112 pitches.

The six walks Kershaw issued over five innings marked his first six-walk outing since April 7, 2010 when he issued six free passes to the Pirates in 4 2/3 innings. The only other time he walked as many was on August 3, 2009 against the Brewers in a four-plus inning outing. Kershaw hasn’t even walked five batters in an outing recently — the last time was September 23, 2012 against the Reds.