How is baseball counting A-Rod’s violations, anyway?

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If A-Rod gets major discipline, it’s going to be because he’s seen as being a multiple-time violator of the drug agreement. Bill Madden of the Daily News was on the Boomer and Carton show today and he was asked what those multiple violations might look like. Here’s Madden:

“We are talking here (about) non-analytical violations, i.e. in absence of a positive drug test,” he said. “OK? Now, let’s just say for example, they have proof — good proof, legitimate proof, records, whatever — that Alex Rodriguez sought to buy drugs. That’s a violation. Now they have proof that Alex Rodriguez actually bought drugs. That’s a violation. Now they have proof that Alex Rodriguez was administered drugs. That’s a third violation.”

Um. OK.

Of course if that were the case every single player who ever tested positive for PEDs would be subject to triple discipline. Because to do that you have to first “seek to buy drugs” then you have to buy drugs then you have to take drugs.  I mean, that’s 100% unavoidable, yes?

I realize Bill Madden is not in charge of the discipline process, but he certainly has sources in MLB who are informing him of the thought process involved with the Biogenesis case. And this is what is passing for logic and justice with respect to A-Rod. We are in a world gone mad. Although, if you think about it, we could use this logic to shorten games:

[Batter at plates, Ump looks in. Batter swings and misses.]

Umpire: “Strike one-two-three, you’re out!!”

Player: “What?!”

Ump: “You thought about swinging, you swung, you missed! You’re out!”

[everyone nods and smiles at how nice it is that umpires are getting tough on batters]

Report: Glen Perkins will retire from baseball

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According to MLB.com’s Rhett Bollinger, Twins GM Thad Levine told 1390 Granite City Sports that reliever Glen Perkins will retire.

Perkins, 34, has battled shoulder injuries over the last two years, limiting him to a total of 7 2/3 innings between 2016-17. His decision doesn’t come as much of a surprise given the circumstances. The Twins declined his $6.5 million club option back in October, making him a free agent.

Across parts of 12 seasons, all with the Twins, Perkins compiled a 3.88 ERA with 120 saves and a 504/158 K/BB ratio in 624 1/3 innings. He ranked among baseball’s best closers from 2013-15, racking up 102 of those saves with a 3.08 ERA. The lefty made the American League All-Star team in each of those three seasons.