Angels bid for Diamondbacks’ Ian Kennedy

12 Comments

The Angels aren’t buyers and the Diamondbacks aren’t sellers, but it seems they might be able to help each other out by doing an Ian Kennedy deal.

Both CBS Sports’ Jon Heyman and FOXSports.com’s Ken Rosenthal have mentioned the possibility. The Padres are also in the running, says MLB.com’s Steve Gilbert.

With Brandon McCarthy (shoulder) set to rejoin the rotation next week and Trevor Cahill (hip, shoulder) just a week behind, the Diamondbacks appear flush with starters. They’ve been using Patrick Corbin, Wade Miley, Kennedy, Randall Delgado and Tyler Skaggs of late, though Skaggs has already been demoted to make room for McCarthy. They also have top prospect Archie Bradley making noise with a 2.28 ERA in 15 starts in Double-A.

The problem is that, other than maybe Corbin, there’s not one guy there that seems like a front-line starter for a postseason rotation. It’s why the Diamondbacks have been mentioned in connection with the White Sox’s Jake Peavy and the Cubs’ Jeff Samardzija. If they could move Kennedy and get a couple of prospects in return, it’d make biting the bullet on a Peavy trade a lot easier.

In Kennedy, the Angels would get a guy who has been a disappointment this year, but one who still makes a modest $4.3 million and who is under control through 2015. With few major league-ready arms in the farm system, he’d be a nice to have around, especially since he’ll cost about half as much as a comparable free agent starter next year.

Kennedy, 28, is 3-7 with a 5.22 ERA this year, though he’s still fanned 101 in 119 innings. He went 21-4 with a 2.88 ERA in 2011 and 15-12 with a 4.02 ERA in 2012, striking out 385 batters in 430 1/3 innings between the two seasons.

Yadier Molina says Adam Jones “has to apologize to the Puerto Rican people”

Getty Images
7 Comments

After the U.S. won the World Baseball Classic on Wednesday night, Adam Jones told a reporter that he and his teammates were motivated in part by the fact that Puerto Rico already had championship t-shirts printed up and plans for a parade/celebration in Puerto Rico in place beforehand.

Which, OK, whatever you need to motivate you, Adam, but all of that seems complicated by the fact that (a) ALL teams playing for a championship have pre-printed gear, thus enabling them to be put on moments after the final out; and (b) Puerto Rico’s celebration plans were not contingent on winning or losing. In fact, they went ahead and had a parade/celebration even though they lost. The WBC was a big deal to them in ways it simply wasn’t to the U.S., so it makes sense.

Yadier Molina of Team Puerto Rico did not take kindly to Jones’ comments. He tells ESPN Deportes this:

“Adam Jones … is talking about things he doesn’t know about,” Molina told ESPN. “He really has to get informed because he shouldn’t have said those comments, let alone in public and mocking the way [preparations] were made . . . He has to apologize to the Puerto Rican people,” Molina said. “Obviously, you wanted to win; he didn’t know what this means to [our] people.”

Kind of a messy little controversy, eh?

My feeling about it is that Jones probably didn’t know the whole story about Puerto Rico’s plans and misinterpreted celebration for arrogance. I also suspect that most players motivate themselves in all manner of irrational ways like this, but we just don’t hear about it all that much. Jones can do whatever he wants to psych himself up, but it changes the equation a bit when you talk about it to the press. Perceived slights that an athlete uses internally can seem petty once exposed to the light of day.

Either way: Jones does not have a reputation for being insulting or disrespectful, so I seriously doubt that was his intent here. I also think that, while Molina has a right to be miffed, the “he must apologize to the Puerto Rican people” thing is laying it on a bit thick. Maybe Jones can just text Molina and some P.R. players and say he was sorry, followed by a “we’re all good, man” and this can end? That makes the most sense.

If not, well, the Orioles do play the Cardinals in an interleague series this summer, so maybe we’ll see some fireworks.

Angel Hernandez ejects Asdrubal Cabrera from a spring training game

Getty Images
12 Comments

You don’t see many ejections in spring training games. The stakes are virtually non-existent, so it’s not like a player is likely to blow up at a bad call or something. That’s especially true now, as we enter spring training’s final week. Everyone wants to get through it uninjured and without fuss. And it’s getting hot in Florida in Arizona too. No one’s got time for that.

Yesterday Asdrubal Cabrera and Angel Hernandez did, though. Cabrera was batting in a road game against the Nats. He asked for time to step out of the box. Hernandez didn’t give it to him. This annoyed Cabrera who, after hitting a single, jawed at Hernandez as he ran out of the box and then pointed at him once he reached first base. Hernandez ran him.

Cabrera didn’t quickly leave the field. He took a slow, slow walk to the outfield and left via the gate in right, which is where visiting players tend to enter and leave spring parks. Watch:

 

Here’s what Cabrera told reporters after the game:

“‘C’mon, man, you’re better than that,’ ” Cabrera said, recalling what he yelled at Hernandez. “And he threw me out.”

Eh. I have no love for Angel Hernandez, but “you’re better than that” is a weak sauce insult. For one thing, maybe the person isn’t better than that? For another, it’s functionally equivalent to “you know better,” which is a thing a parent says to a kid. It’s fine when your dad says it, but Cabrera isn’t Hernandez’s dad and thus saying so carries with it an implicit belittling intent. It’s an ad hominem, which violates the usual ump-player understanding in which you can say a call was b.s. but don’t say the ump is a jerk personally.

More generally, it’s just cowardly. It’s designed not to deal with the substance of the beef. “You are a fine person all of the time, kind sir, but in this instance you are not up to par.” Well, why? Say so or shut up and quit being passive-aggressive.

Again: Hernandez is generally horrible. He’s not better than that, actually. But Cabrera deserved to get run, if for no other reason, than his insult was lame.