Florida judge denies motion to throw out MLB’s lawsuit against Biogenesis


There was plenty of skepticism when MLB filed a lawsuit against Biogenesis and Anthony Bosch earlier this year, but they scored an important victory earlier today. Julie K. Brown of the Miami Herald has the story:

After pondering such thorny issues as stale cookies and a Major League baseball player who used the alias “Al Capone” to buy performance enhancing drugs, a Miami-Dade Circuit Court judge denied a motion to toss out the sport’s civil lawsuit against Biogenesis, the South Florida doping pipeline to baseball players and other professional athletes — as well as collegiate and high school players.

Monday’s decision, by Judge Ronald Dresnick, means that Major League Baseball can use the legal system to force witnesses to give depositions that may substantiate Biogenesis founder Tony Bosch’s story that his clinic supplied banned substances to high-profile major leaguers for many years.

MLB sued Biogenesis, Anthony Bosch, and other associates back in March, alleging that they interfered with players’ contracts by giving them performance-enhancing drugs. Bosch has since agreed to cooperate with MLB’s investigation. In return, he’ll be dropped from the lawsuit and receive help with his legal fees.

Those subpoenaed by MLB include former University of Miami pitching coach Lazaro Collazo, who is accused of acting as a middleman for the clinic. While he isn’t a part of MLB’s lawsuit against Biogenesis, he was among those arguing for its dismissal today. However, Dresnick’s ruling means that he could now be forced to talk under oath about what he knows. Alex Rodriguez’s cousin, Yuri Sucart, was also issued a subpoena by MLB.

Hall of Fame will no longer use Chief Wahoo on Hall of Fame plaques

Getty Images
1 Comment

Last month, in the wake of his election to the Hall of Fame, Jim Thome made it clear that he wanted to be inducted as a Cleveland Indian but that he did not want to have Chief Wahoo on his plaque.

His reasoning: even though that was the cap he wore for almost all of his time in Cleveland, “because of all the history and everything involved” he did not think it was the right thing to do. The context, of course, was the club’s decision, under pressure from Major League Baseball, to scrap the Wahoo logo due to its racial insensitivity, which it appears Thome agrees with.

Hall plaque decisions are not 100% up to the player, however. Rather, the Hall of Fame, while taking player sentiment into account, makes a judgment about the historical accuracy and representativeness of Hall plaques. This is to prevent a club from entering into a contract with a player to wear its logo on the plaque even if he only played with them for a short time or from a player simply picking his favorite club (or spiting his least-favorite), even if he only spent an inconsequential season or two there. Think Wade Boggs as a Devil Ray or Frank Robinson as, I dunno, a Dodger.

In the case of Chief Wahoo, the Hall has not only granted Thome’s wish, but has decreed that no new plaque will have Wahoo on it going forward:

To be fair, I can’t think of another player who wore Wahoo who would make the Hall of Fame in an Indians cap after Thome. Possibly Manny Ramirez if he ever gets in, though he may have a better claim to a Red Sox cap (debate it in the comments). Albert Belle appears on Veterans Committee ballots, but I’d bet my cats that he’s never getting it in. If younger players like Corey Kluber or Francisco Lindor or someone make it in, they’ll likely have just as much history in a Block-C or whatever the Indians get to replace Wahoo with than anything else, so it’s not really an issue for them.

Still, a nice gesture from the Hall, both to accommodate Thome’s wishes and to acknowledge the inappropriateness of using Chief Wahoo for any purpose going forward.