Miguel Sano back in action Sunday at Double-A New Britain following four-game benching

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Miguel Sano has emerged from the Twins’ doghouse.

According to Mike Bernadino of the St. Paul Pioneer Press, the 20-year-old third baseman is back in the starting lineup on Sunday at Double-A New Britain after sitting out four games for disciplinary reasons.

Sano, a powerful young slugger with 81 homers in 349 career minor league games, got himself into trouble for pimping this solo shot Tuesday against the Red Sox’ Double-A affiliate from Portland, Maine. And he apparently did not take kindly to his initial benching, which extended the team-assigned punishment even further.

Sano, the No. 3 prospect in affiliated ball according to Baseball America‘s midseason Top 50, is batting .294/.390/.621 with 26 home runs and 76 RBI in 93 games this year between High-A Fort Myers and Double-A New Britain. He will surely drop his bat and run directly to first base after all future moonshots.

The Angels were the first team to use up all of their mound visits

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Last night’s Angels-Astros game was a long affair with a bunch of homers and the use of 11 pitchers in all. The Angels used six pitchers and all of that business led to plenty of conferences. Six, in fact, which is their allotment under the new rule capping mound visits. As far as I can tell, that makes the Angels the first team to use up all of their mound visits since the advent of the rule.

Sadly, they did not try to go for a seventh, thereby testing the currently unknown limits of the rule. Umpires have been instructed to not allow additional mound visits, but they cannot issue balls or tackle anyone or anything to enforce it. Presumably, if Maldonado had walked out to talk to Cam Bedrosian about the weather or where he was going to dinner after the game, the home plate umpire would’ve simply done the old Robin Williams English policeman’s bit of yelling “Stop! . . . or I shall yell ‘Stop!’ again!” Maybe a fine would issue later, but we’ll never know.

At least until someone breaks the limit. And we know someone will, right? We should have a betting pool on who does it.