Tyler Clippard says the Nationals have handled Drew Storen “very poorly”

129 Comments

Drew Storen was demoted to Triple-A Syracuse after yesterday’s doubleheader against the Mets. It’s a dramatic fall from grace for someone who looked like one of the best young relievers in the game just two years ago. Coming off his implosion during the NLDS last October against the Cardinals, Storen owns a 5.95 ERA through 47 appearances this season.

While sending Storen down to the minors is probably the best thing for him at this point, fellow reliever Tyler Clippard had some critical words for the organizational after the game, telling Mark Zuckerman of CSNWashington.com that signing Rafael Soriano over the winter sent the wrong message.

“I think there’s a lot of things that led to this that could’ve been prevented,” Clippard said, holding back tears at one point. “You know, you basically send a guy a message this offseason, for having one bad game, that he’s not the guy for the job. He’s only human. I mean, it’s going to get to anybody. …

“I can understand, you know, after the devastation that happened last year, maybe trying to make a change and say: ‘Hey, we’re going to bring in somebody that we think can get it done in that big situation,” Clippard added. “It’s just the wrong message to send, I think. But at the end of the day, that’s what happened and that’s where we’re at. It’s up to me, it’s up to Drew, it’s up to everyone in this locker room to pick ourselves up and move forward.”

“It’s one of those things that I think was handled very poorly by the organization. But at the same time, that’s the decision that was made and we have to move forward as a team. We have great guys in this locker room that are going to get it done. We’re going to make a playoff push at the end of the season, I have no doubt about that. But this is a tough day.”

Ouch. It should be stated that Clippard is Storen’s best friend on the team, so the emotional reaction is understandable. And we shouldn’t judge him too much for that. Reporters asked him what he thought right after the move happened, so he gave an honest and raw reaction.

On paper, the addition of Soriano improved a strength, but it has clearly had some unintended consequences. Storen is a mess right now, either because of the uncertainty of pitching in a set-up role or because he hasn’t gotten over what happened last October. Or most likely, some combination of the two. Hopefully taking him out of the spotlight for a while can get his career back on track.

David DeJesus retires

Harry How/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Outfielder David DeJesus announced his retirement from Major League Baseball on Twitter Wednesday afternoon. He’ll be joining CSN Chicago for Cubs coverage.

DeJesus, 37, spent 13 seasons in the big leagues from 2003-15 with the Royals, Athletics, Cubs, Nationals, Rays, and Angels. He hit a composite .275/.349/.512 with 99 home runs and 573 RBI across 5,916 plate appearances.

We wish the best of luck to DeJesus as he begins a new career in sports media.

Dallas Green: 1934-2017

Rich Schultz/Getty Images
4 Comments

Former major league pitcher, manager, and front office executive Dallas Green has died at the age of 82, Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports reports.

Green pitched for the Phillies for the first five years of his career from 1960-64, then went to the Washington Sentators, the Mets, and back to the Phillies before retiring after the ’67 season. He managed the Phillies from 1979-81, leading them to the organization’s first ever championship in ’80. The Cubs hired Green after the 1981 season to serve as executive vice president and general manager. He quit after the ’87 season. Green briefly managed the Yankees in ’89, then took the helm of the Mets from ’93-96.

Green was a controversial figure during his managing and GM days as he was not afraid to say exactly what he was thinking. He got into many conflicts with his players and coaches, but some think it helped the Phillies in the World Series in 1980. The Phillies inducted him into their Wall of Fame in 2006.