Albert Pujols

Alex Rodriguez for Albert Pujols…. who says no?

35 Comments

Sure, this is as far-fetched as they come, but wouldn’t both the Yankees and the Angels have to think about this?

Alex Rodriguez currently has about $100 million left on his 10-year, $275 million contract that expires in 2017. Along with a $3 million portion of his signing bonus due next January, he’ll receives salaries of $25 million in 2014, $21 million in 2015 and $20 million in both 2016-17. Plus, he’s still owed about a third of his $28 million salary from 2013.

Albert Pujols, on the other hand, has about $218 million left on his backloaded 10-year, $240 million contract through 2021. His salary jumps from $16 million this year to $23 million next year and then increases by $1 million each season until he makes $30 million in year 10.

So, basically there’s a $120 million difference between the contracts. If you equate A-Rod’s deal as being $100 million of completely dead money, then it’s essentially taking on Pujols at $120 million for 8 1/3 years, a bit less than $15 million per year.

At this point, that’s overly expensive. If Pujols were declared a free agent today, no one is giving him $120 million. Maybe someone would take a chance on him at $15 million per year for two or three years.

Except, for the Yankees, the math is actually a bit more generous. Pujols’ deal, being worth $24 million annually rather than $27.5 million, would aid the Yankees with the luxury tax and make it a little easier to come in under the threshold in 2014 as they desperately want to do.

Frankly, I still think the Yankees say no. I expect Pujols to bounce back and have a couple of better seasons than his 2013 campaign, but the last five years of his deal are a killer. He’s going to make $140 million from ages 37-41. Plus, the Yankees already have Mark Teixeira presumably vastly overpaid at first base. The swap would make a bit more sense if the Angels kicked in the $20 million they’ve saved these first two years by backloading the contract.

With all of the money they’d shed, the Angels would be foolish not to accept the deal if it were proposed to them. After all, there’s the added bonus of not having to pay Rodriguez while he’s suspended by MLB. And maybe he will someday be ruled permanently disabled, at which point insurance would cover 80 percent of his salary.

And, no, I didn’t forget Pujols himself. He has no-trade protection and almost certainly would say no to such a deal. Even if he were curious about playing for the Yankees, it’d be quite the drag on his legacy if he were traded straight up for the most toxic player in baseball.

Video: Jarrod Dyson becomes the first in Marlins Park history to rob a home run

SURPRISE, AZ - FEBRUARY 25:  Jarrod Dyson #1 of the Kansas City Royals poses for a portrait during spring training photo day at Surprise Stadium on February 25, 2016 in Surprise, Arizona.  (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
Christian Petersen/Getty Images
1 Comment

Marlins Park has been around since 2012, but coming into Thursday’s action, the ballpark hadn’t seen any player rob a home run. Royals outfielder Jarrod Dyson changed that in Thursday night’s series finale in Miami.

Christian Yelich smoked a 1-2 slider that Edinson Volquez left up in the zone, hitting what looked like a solo home run to straightaway center field. Dyson gave chase, timed his leap, and snagged the ball in spectacular fashion to save a run on Volquez’s behalf.

The Statcast numbers are pretty impressive:

Indeed, Dyson’s snag is the first home run robbery at Marlins Park, according to ESPN Stats & Info.

Mets are considering pushing back Jacob deGrom’s next start

SAN FRANCISCO, CA - AUGUST 18: Jacob deGrom #48 of the New York Mets pitches against the San Francisco Giants during the first inning at AT&T Park on August 18, 2016 in San Francisco, California.  (Photo by Jason O. Watson/Getty Images)
Jason O. Watson/Getty Images
Leave a comment

The Mets are concerned with starter Jacob deGrom and are considering pushing back his next start, MLB.com’s Anthony DiComo reports. The club thinks the right-hander is fatigued.

deGrom, 28, has had another strong season, currently standing with a 2.96 ERA and a 137/32 K/BB ratio in 143 innings. However, he’s battled command issues in his last two starts. Against the Giants and Cardinals, he gave up a combined 13 earned runs on 25 hits and three walks with eight strikeouts in nine and two-thirds innings.

The Mets are already without Steven Matz, Zach Wheeler, Matt Harvey, and Jon Niese. deGrom’s recent bout is just the latest in what has been a season-long starting pitching struggle for the club. Nevertheless, only the Cubs (2.85) and Nationals (3.57) have posted a better aggregate starting pitching ERA than the Mets’ 3.66.