Tampa Bay Rays' Price pitches against Boston Red Sox  during MLB American League Baseball game in Boston

And That Happened: Wednesday’s scores and highlights

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Rays 5, Red Sox 1: David Price tossed a one-run, five hit complete game, with a solo homer by Mike Napoli the only real blemish. He needed a mere 97 pitches. That’s what happens when you throw 72 strikes. The Sox and Rays are once again tied in the loss column.

Dodgers 8, Blue Jays 3: For the second day in a row a team scores a boatload of runs in the tenth inning. We should probably come up with a name for that. I’m sure the Germans have a name for it with multiple syllables already because they’re so good at that. I’m thinking the word “shambles” has to be in it. Like “Exrasshambles” or something. Anyway, the Dodgers are apparently indestructible these days.

Pirates 4, Nationals 2: The “Kill the Win” alarm was buzzing loudly at Brian Kenny’s house last night as Stephen Strasburg tossed eight two-hit innings with 12 strikeouts and took the loss. That’s what happens, though, when one of those hits you allow is a solo homer and your opponent — Francisco Liranio — tosses shutout ball into the eighth. Drew Storen has been a hot mess for the Nats all year. The Nats haven’t won a game since the break and, my picking them as a team that could make a move in the second half notwithstanding, are now nine freakin’ games back.

Athletics 4, Astros 3: The A’s take their 11th of 12 games so far this year against Houston, this on a come from behind job powered by a Coco Crisp two-run homer. Someone asked Crisp after the game if the A’s offense relies too much on homers. The idea that a team hits too many homers always makes me chuckle. It’s like asking someone if they’re too rich or too thin.

Braves 8, Mets 2: A win, yes, but an awful loss in the form of Tim Hudson’s freak fractured ankle that will put him out for the season. Don’t seek out the video of this one, folks. It’s Tim Krumrie stuff.

Angels 1, Twins 0: Jered Weaver: 8 IP, 2 H, 0 ER, 9K. Pretty much says it all.

Brewers 3, Padres 1: Kyle Lohse with a strong outing. He’s quietly been pretty great for the Brewers lately, going 6-1 with a 2.51 ERA over his past 11 starts. The Brewers should probably try to flip him.

Indians 10, Mariners 1: Down goes the Mariners win streak. Scott Kazmir tossed one-hit ball for eight innings, allowing nothin’ but an unearned run. Michael Bourn hit a grand slam. Asdrubal Cabrera homered and drove in three. Eleven runs scored in this game and it lasted a mere six minutes more than the 1-0 Angels-Twins game.

Cardinals 11, Phillies 3: Another day Ruben Amaro is reported to still be a buyer at the deadline, another day the Phillies get thumped. Sixteen hits for the Cardinals.

Rockies 2, Marlins 1: Yet another nice pitching performance last night. This one from Jorge De La Rosa, who tossed six scoreless. Colorado can force a 2-2 tie in what I like to think of as the 1993 Expansion Series if they win today.

Cubs 7, Diamondbacks 6: Chicago had a 6-0 lead, blew it, but then Nate Schierholtz — who had five RBI overall — drove in the go-ahead run in the 12th. Basically any team could’ve had Schierholtz before the season began. No one wanted him but the Cubs. He’s hitting .277/.334/.521. How’s your team’s right fielder doin’?

Rangers 3, Yankees 1: Matt Garza makes his Texas debut and allowed only one unearned run in seven and a third. Homers from A.J. Pierzynski and David Murphy.

Reds 8, Giants 3: Mike Leake somehow survived six innings of one-run ball despite allowing 12 hits. He also went 3 for 4 and scored a run. Joey Votto, Brandon Phillips and Devin Mesoraco each drove in two. The Reds finish their season series with the Giants having taken six of seven. I suppose that doesn’t totally make up for last year’s playoffs, but it’s something.

Tigers 6, White Sox 2: Anibal Sanchez joins the parade of great starting pitching performances last night, tossing six scoreless. Prince Fielder, Austin Jackson and Torii Hunter homered.

Royals 4, Orioles 3: Two homers for Eric Hosmer. More like Eric Homer, amirite?  God, I don’t know why I keep doing that. More coffee please.  Good morning everyone.

Murray Chass rightfully nails Major League Baseball on minority hiring

Rob Manfred
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When Murray Chass lays off his vendettas against the people he feels have wronged him, he’s still capable of making some sharp points. Particularly when he’s working in his old bailiwick of the business of baseball.

On Sunday he wrote a blog post about minority hiring in baseball. As in, the nearly complete lack of it, at least in front offices:

Manfred has talked a better job on minority hiring than he has performed. He has created a pipeline program through which members of minorities are supposed to be able to advance into major league front office positions. However, no role models seem to exist as inspiration for younger employees.

In Manfred’s 20 months as commissioner, clubs have hired or promoted 19 high-ranking executives. Eighteen of the 19 are white males. The lone minority is Al Avila, the Tigers’ general manager.

Chass reports that Rob Manfred and, in the past, Bud Selig have leaned on clubs to hire friends or trusted lieutenants but claim they have no power to tell clubs who to hire when it comes to minorities. It’s pretty dang good point.

Moving beyond Chass’ points, it’s worth observing that one way baseball could better populate the executive ranks would be to hire more minorities in entry-level positions. What a better way to become a friend and crony than to have, you know, been there a long time? The game has had a horrible track record in doing this, however, for one simple reason: it pays crap wages for all but the highest of executive positions, pushing away candidates for whom money is, in fact, an object to pursuing a dream in baseball which, by demographic necessity, favors the rich and thus favors whites. Earlier this year MLB launched a pipeline program aimed at getting more minority candidates into entry level MLB jobs. That’s a good start to addressing the problem, but it’s going to take years for that to bear fruit, assuming it ever does.

Back in June Kate Morrison and Russell A. Carleton of Baseball Prospectus wrote a four-part series regarding this very issue, and it’s well worth your time. Among the points made is one that, given his vendettas, Chass surprisingly didn’t make himself: sabermetrics is partially to blame! Go read Kate and Russell’s work on that, but the short version: front offices want MBA/STEM types now, not people with athletic backgrounds. People with those degrees have expensive educations and, in turn, cannot afford to take pennies to work in baseball when they can make far more in other industries, thereby continuing to favor the rich and the white.

I don’t think Rob Manfred or Bud Selig before him or the people who run major league baseball teams are bigots. I don’t think that baseball, as a whole, wants to keep minorities out of top jobs. Chass doesn’t make such a claim either and he, like I, noted the pipeline program.

But baseball is a business rife with cronyism and nepotism which leads those in power to hire friends and relatives, thereby keeping the executive class overwhelmingly male and white. Baseball has shown that, when it wants to, it can lean on teams to make certain hiring choices. Will it do the same to push for greater minority representation in management ranks? Or will it continue to throw up its hands up and say “hey, that’s on the clubs?”

Tim Tebow hits a homer in his first instructional league at bat

PORT ST. LUCIE, FL - SEPTEMBER 20: Tim Tebow #15 of the New York Mets hits a home run at an instructional league day at Tradition Field on September 20, 2016 in Port St. Lucie, Florida. (Photo by Rob Foldy/Getty Images)
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Because of course he did.

It wasn’t just his first at bat, but it was his first pitch. It came off of John Kilichowski, an 11th round draft pick of the St. Louis Cardinals out of Vanderbilt.  The ball went out to left center, off the bat of the lefty Tebow.

Next time, meat, throw him a breaking ball.