UPDATE: Doctor hired by A-Rod did not examine him, merely looked at an MRI

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UPDATE: The Post has comments from the doctor. He never examined A-Rod. He merely reviewed A-Rod’s MRI at his request. His verdict: he didn’t say anything significant on the MRI. That said, he takes great pains to say that he wasn’t giving a formal second opinion and is in no position to say whether or not A-Rod can play. It was merely his take on the MRI.

Which sorta makes it sound like A-Rod is doctor shopping with the purpose of getting some sort of message across in what one can only assume is a pretty tense showdown between he and the Yankees regarding his ability to play. Or about the P.R. component regarding whether he is able to play. Which isn’t quite the same thing.

1:30 PM: This is simply delicious:

Is he faking? Are the Yankees keeping him out on purpose? Is the doctor crazypants? Are these things mutually-exclusive? I’d say (a) maybe; (b) maybe; (c) maybe; (d) no.

And that no matter what the truth is here, someone is gonna come out looking bad. Either A-Rod for appearing to be hiding, the Yankees for being unwilling — possibly out of P.R. concerns — to activate a player who might actually improve their team, even if it’s just for a week or two before Bud’s hammer comes down.

As for the doctor: man, this guy sure does speak out of turn a lot for a dude who is supposed to keep client confidentiality. Probably worth noting that doctors can only do that if their patient tells them they can …

As for the Yankees: boy, A-Rod being totally healthy sure would look bad for their alleged attempts to get insurance to cover his contract on some disability retirement scheme. It’s almost as if someone in A-Rod’s position would like to see the Yankees squirm a bit here. It’s almost as if they’d like him to STFU. Hmm …

All I know is that I hope it’s A-Rod who is seen as the bad actor here. He’s murdered 19 people after all, so I’m sure he can take the heat.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.