We still don’t know what the basis of the Braun discipline was

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You’ve heard me blather for two days now — my favorite hate comment so far was one calling me “calcaterr-ible” — so this is more of a links thing. Two good ones.

First: Tom Haudricourt of the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel talking about the decision making, such as he can determine it, into the length of Ryan Braun’s suspension. It puts to rest the notion — floated by some scribes on Twitter yesterday — that Braun was suspended “50 games for the violation, 15 games for being an a**hole.” Which is hilarious if it were true, but sadly isn’t.

But the notion that it was 65 days because “it just happened to be 65 games left [in the season]. If he had gotten back to them a day later, it would have been 64 games” is a bit curious. If A-Rod delays a week, does he get less of a suspension? Is MLB just trying to put an end-cap on all discipline happening this season?

The other worthy link is from Tim Marchman over at Deadspin, who actually put the question of where the 65 games came from to both MLB and MLBPA.  The answers are … less than illuminating.

None of which makes the discipline bad policy or bad form in any way. It just would be nice to know what standards the league is applying and how it’s coming to these decisions. Maybe that’s for after all of the Biogenesis discipline is done. But it should come at some point.

Clayton Kershaw struggles with control, walks six Marlins

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Dodgers ace Clayton Kershaw entered Wednesday night’s start against the Marlins without having issued a walk in his previous three starts. In fact, his last walk came on April 3 when he issued a free pass to Paul Goldschmidt with the bases empty and two outs in the bottom of the first inning. All told, Kershaw was on a streak of 26 walk-less innings before he took the mound at home to take on the Marlins.

Kershaw started off Wednesday in character, striking out the side in the first inning. He issued a walk in a tough second inning, but escaped without allowing a run. Kershaw walked two more in the third and again danced out of danger. In the fourth, Kershaw walked Lewis Brinson to load the bases with no outs and — you guessed it — didn’t end up allowing a run. His errant control finally came back to bite him in the fifth when Kershaw issued back-to-back two-out walks, then served up a three-run home run to Miguel Rojas down the left field line. His night was done when he completed the inning. Five innings, three runs, five hits, six walks, seven strikeouts, 112 pitches.

The six walks Kershaw issued over five innings marked his first six-walk outing since April 7, 2010 when he issued six free passes to the Pirates in 4 2/3 innings. The only other time he walked as many was on August 3, 2009 against the Brewers in a four-plus inning outing. Kershaw hasn’t even walked five batters in an outing recently — the last time was September 23, 2012 against the Reds.