This hasn’t been one of Robinson Cano’s better days

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Robinson Cano is aiming for one of the biggest contracts in baseball history as a free agent this winter, and it’s safe to say he’ll end up a very, very wealthy man. Still, two pieces of news today haven’t helped his cause at all.

Most will point to Dustin Pedroia’s seemingly under-market seven-year, $100 million extension with the Red Sox as a problem for Cano. Since Pedroia was already under control for 2014 and ’15, the new contract essentially amounts to a six-year extension worth $15 million per year, which is about half as much annually as Cano is going to be gunning for in a few months. Being that Pedroia is a $20 million-$25 million player right now, it seems like quite a bargain.

Personally, I don’t think Pedroia’s deal has any bearing on Cano’s situation. The two are comparable players, but their situations weren’t at all alike. The biggest factor here is that Pedroia was already under control for two more years; the Red Sox had little reason to pay him market value to get a deal done now. And regardless of whether a Pedroia extension could be worked out, the Red Sox weren’t going to be suitors for Cano this winter.

No, the potentially much bigger problem for Cano’s camp is that the Dodgers have reportedly signed Cuban infielder Alexander Guerrero to a seven-year, $32 million contract, likely to play second base. The Dodgers are, right now, the richest team in baseball and they presented Cano with the most attractive alternative to the Yankees in free agency this winter. Of course, they still might; the Dodgers are so loaded that they could still sign Guerrero and make a huge bid for Cano later. After all, they didn’t let the $42 million Yasiel Puig signing prevent them from taking on Carl Crawford’s contract last year. But their desire for a second baseman will hinge on how Guerrero looks these next two months. Maybe he’ll be impressive enough defensively to warrant a move back to shortstop.

There’s certainly no reason to cry for Cano. Even if he can’t play the Dodgers off the Yankees, he’ll still get $25 million per year. But his hopes of a $200 million deal may hinge on another team stepping up, and typical big spenders like the Red Sox, Rangers, Angels, Tigers and Phillies could all sit this one out.

Report: Mets ownership backs Terry Collins

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The Mets entered Sunday night’s game against the Pirates with a disappointing 20-27 record. While the club has dealt with a litany of injuries, manager Terry Collins has also drawn criticism for in-game decision-making, particularly regarding his decision-making.

Owner Fred Wilpon is still Collins’ strongest supporter, however, Newsday’s Marc Carig reports. As a result, the team is unlikely to make a managerial change anytime soon. If the Mets continue to struggle, though, ownership may feel pressured to make a change.

Collins became the longest-tenured manager in Mets history last week. Collins managed the Mets to a 77-85 record in 2011 and has overall helped the club go 501-518, winning the NL Pennant in 2015. He is not signed to a contract beyond this season.

Joe Mauer becomes first Twin to reach base seven times in a game since Rod Carew

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Twins first baseman Joe Mauer had a game for the record books on Sunday against the Rays. He finished 4-for-5 with an RBI double, a solo home run, two singles, and three walks in eight plate appearances. Unfortunately for him, the Twins still lost 8-6 in 15 innings.

ESPN’s Stats & Info notes that Mauer is the first Twin to reach base seven times in one game since Rod Carew in 1972 against the Brewers. The last player to reach base seven times in one game (without the aid of an error) was Giants shortstop Brandon Crawford on August 8 last season against the Marlins. The feat has only been accomplished seven times this decade, so about once a year.

After Sunday’s game, Mauer is batting .283/.363/.408 with three home runs, 18 RBI, and 23 runs scored in 171 plate appearances. Not too shabby.