Matt Kemp doesn’t want the 2011 NL MVP award

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Dodgers outfielder Matt Kemp narrowly lost the 2011 NL Most Valuable Player award to Brewers outfielder Ryan Braun. That the two were separated by about 60 points in voting illustrates just how close the race was. Now that we’ve learned that Braun did, in fact, use performance-enhancing drugs, that race isn’t nearly as close for a lot of people. Some have suggested retroactively naming Kemp the 2011 NL MVP and stripping Braun of his award.

Kemp isn’t one of those people. He thinks he lost the 2011 NL MVP race fair and square as it was chosen not by Braun but by writers. Via Dylan Hernandez of the L.A. Times:

“Honestly, it doesn’t have anything to do with me,” Kemp said. “I was in a race to win the MVP, I got second. It is what it is. The voters had an opinion about who they wanted to pick as the MVP. That’s who they picked, that’s who they felt was the MVP. You have to respect them for that. The other stuff, it is what it is, man. For me, all I’m worried about is getting healthy and getting back on the field and helping my team win.”

Hernandez added this bit, showing that Kemp may feel at least somewhat deserving of the award:

“It would definitely be nice to have a MVP trophy,” he said. “But I didn’t win the MVP. I lost. I got second.”

To a cheater, he was a reminded.

“Yeah…. OK.… Yeah,” he said, smiling.

Kemp did say Braun should be stripped of the award, per MLB.com’s Ken Gurnick:

“Do I feel like it should be stripped? I mean, yeah, I do,” Kemp said. “I feel like it should be, but that’s not for me to decide, you know? That’s not for me to decide.”

As for Kemp’s ailing ankle suffered sliding into Nationals catcher Kurt Suzuki on Sunday, the team will decide tomorrow if he will need another stint on the disabled list, according to Gurnick.

Aaron Judge set a new postseason strikeout record

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For a few days, it looked like Aaron Judge was finally hitting his stride in the postseason. He was still striking out at a regular clip, piling more and more strikeouts atop the 16 he racked up in the Division Series, but he was mashing, too. He engineered a three-run homer during Game 3 of the Championship Series, followed by another blast and game-tying double in Game 4. His one-out double helped pad a five-run lead in Game 5, while his 425-footer off of Brad Peacock barely made a dent during a 7-1 loss in Game 6. And then Lance McCullers‘ curveball found and fooled him, as it did five of the 14 batters it met in Game 7:

The strikeout was Judge’s first of the evening and 27th since the start of the playoffs. No other major league batter has racked up that many strikeouts in a single postseason, though Alfonso Soriano’s 26-strikeout record in 2003 comes the closest. Within that record, Judge also collected three golden sombreros (four strikeouts in a single game), narrowly avoiding the dreaded platinum sombrero (five strikeouts in a single game).

It’s an unfortunate footnote to a spectacular year for the rookie outfielder, who decimated the competition with 52 home runs and 8.2 fWAR during the regular season and was a pivotal part of the Yankees’ playoff run. Thankfully, the image of McCullers’ curveball darting just under Judge’s bat won’t be the image that sticks with us for years to come. Instead, it’ll look something like this: