The Daily News is still pushing the “A-Rod will never play again” angle

20 Comments

This is getting pathological. The New York Daily News has been pushing the idea that A-Rod will never play again angle for some time. Their thinking, as much as I can follow it anyway, is that A-Rod, in an effort to protect his legacy or his money or avoid Biogenesis punishment or … something … is going to try to portray himself as physically unable to play, sit back and collect his salary either from the Yankees or insurance companies or both.

That meme went a bit quiet for a couple weeks as A-Rod played in rehab games and actually hit home runs and stuff. Now, after A-Rod has been put on a shelf with a strained quad, it’s back again with a vengeance. Here’s John Harper:

Whether it is convenient timing for Alex Rodriguez or simply revealing of the state of his body, the quadriceps strain that showed up on an MRI on Sunday is more reason than ever to believe that A-Rod will never play for the Yankees again … If he can make that case before a suspension becomes official, Daily News’ sources say that insurance policies, either that of the Yankees’ or A-Rod’s personal policy, would allow him to keep all or most of the money he would otherwise lose.
So was he really only an unforeseen quad injury away from being activated? Or was something like this going to get in the way of him rejoining the Yankees as the time on his 20-day minor league rehab ran out?

I love conspiracy theories, but only to the extent they make a lick of sense. No, I have no idea if A-Rod will ever play again. He could get hit by a bus tomorrow. He could strain three more things and then need Tommy John surgery. His could be the first Tommy John surgery in history to be described as “unsuccessful” after it’s over by virtue of a honey badger breaking into the operating room and killing the anesthesiologist. I really have no clue.

But I do know that the Daily News’ insurance theory makes no sense as they’ve described it. A-Rod does not save any money if he’s on the DL when he gets suspended for Biogenesis (he loses salary either way). Nothing in his history or character suggests he’ll simply choose to go away with a fake medical retirement out of shame or embarrassment because he has no shame and seems incapable of it. Finally, and most importantly, the notion that the Yankees can simply make a phone call to an insurance company after what, under Harper’s theory, is a bogus quad injury and expect checks for tens of millions of dollars to start arriving is beyond laughable. The man was playing baseball games pretty effectively four days ago.

Derek Jeter strains his quad after rehab and its a quad strain. A-Rod does it and it’s a sinister plot. I shouldn’t be surprised, I suppose, but I can’t help but wondering how on Earth the Daily News publishes this stuff with a straight face.

Mets acquire Jacob Rhame from Dodgers

Getty Images
Leave a comment

The Mets acquired right-handed reliever Jacob Rhame from the Dodgers, the team announced on Sunday. Rhame is the player to be named later in the trade that sent outfielder Curtis Granderson to Los Angeles on Friday night. He’s expected to report to the Mets’ Triple-A affiliate.

Rhame, 24, pitched through his second Triple-A campaign with the Oklahoma City Dodgers in 2017, collecting two saves in 41 appearances and logging a 4.31 ERA, 1.9 BB/9 and 10.3 SO/9 through 48 innings. While his ERA saw a sharp spike from its modest 3.29 mark in 2016 (perhaps thanks in part to a midseason DL stint due to an undisclosed injury), he’s controlling the ball better than he has in several years and has drawn some attention with a fastball that occasionally touches 98 MPH on the radar gun.

The Mets’ bullpen hasn’t been at its finest over the last few weeks, ranking 16th among its major league competitors with a collective 4.50 ERA and 2.4 fWAR, but likely isn’t looking to add an extreme fly ball pitcher to its staff just yet. Until he gets his big league break, Rhame will beef up Triple-A Vegas’ relief corps alongside fellow right-handers Yaisel Sierra, Joe Broussard and Josh Ravin.

Cardinals and Pirates prepare to play unusual finale in first-ever MLB Little League Classic

Getty Images
3 Comments

The Pirates and Cardinals will switch things up for Sunday’s series finale, moving from the spacious PNC Park to the renovated Minor League confines of BB&T Ballpark at Historic Bowman Field. Normally the home stadium for the Phillies’ Short-Season Single-A Williamsport Crosscutters, Historic Bowman Field will set the stage for an unusual — and unprecedented — matchup between the NL Central rivals as they take the field for the first-ever MLB Little League Baseball Classic.

The game will cap a packed day for Major League and Little League participants alike, as four Little League double-elimination games will be played in the morning and afternoon before the Pirates’ Ivan Nova and Cardinals’ Mike Leake face off at 7:00 PM ET. Despite drawing national attention, the Classic will be invitation-only, and its projected 2,366 attendees will comprise the lowest capacity attendance figure in Major League history.

The event is designed to spark more interest in the sport, especially among young players, and Cardinals’ manager Mike Matheny called it “grassroots marketing at its finest.” “We all fell in love with the game and started dreaming about playing on a field like this at the age of these kids we’re going to go see in Williamsport,” he told reporters prior to Sunday’s game. “I hope there are some kids that we can encourage and maybe give a different look of the game and create some lifelong baseball fans that might not have been there otherwise.”

Judging by the excitement that infused the pregame festivities among the players, it looks like they’re already on the right track.