MLB commends Ryan Braun for taking responsibility. Which, OK. I guess he partially did.


Ryan Braun and Major League Baseball have both issued statements in light of this afternoon’s bombshell suspension. First Braun:

“As I have acknowledged in the past, I am not perfect.  I realize now that I have made some mistakes.  I am willing to accept the consequences of those actions.  This situation has taken a toll on me and my entire family, and it is has been a distraction to my teammates and the Brewers organization.  I am very grateful for the support I have received from players, ownership and the fans in Milwaukee and around the country.  Finally, I wish to apologize to anyone I may have disappointed – all of the baseball fans especially those in Milwaukee, the great Brewers organization, and my teammates.  I am glad to have this matter behind me once and for all, and I cannot wait to get back to the game I love.”

That’s nice. Although it doesn’t account for the statements he made last year in which he impugned the integrity — however obliquely — of the MLB contractor who was responsible for shipping his sample. Nor has he acknowledged that he lied in his public statements regarding the nature of his relationship with Anthony Bosch earlier this year when he said his legal team used him as a consultant.

But MLB seems willing to look past that and put the Braun chapter of this mess in the rear-view mirror:

“We commend Ryan Braun for taking responsibility for his past actions,” said Rob Manfred, Executive Vice President, Economics & League Affairs for Major League Baseball. “We all agree that it is in the best interests of the game to resolve this matter.  When Ryan returns, we look forward to him making positive contributions to Major League Baseball, both on and off the field.”

It seems that the evidence against Braun was pretty darn strong. And that Braun was one of the players Michael Weiner had in mind when he said last week that the MLBPA would be strongly counseling players against whom there was overwhelming evidence to not appeal.

Clayton Kershaw completes spring training with a 0.00 ERA

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Clayton Kershaw had nothing left to prove when he exited the mound during his last Cactus League start on Friday. He finished camp with a 0.00 ERA, made all the more impressive after he extended his scoreless streak to 21 1/3 innings following 6 2/3 frames of one-hit ball against the Royals.

In six spring training starts this year, the Dodgers southpaw racked up 12 hits, four walks and 23 strikeouts. His velocity appeared to fluctuate between the high-80s and low-90s from start to start, but manager Dave Roberts told reporters that he expects Kershaw to get back up to the 93 m.p.h. range next week. Kershaw is tabbed for his eighth consecutive Opening Day start on Thursday.

The 30-year-old lefty is poised to enter his 11th season with the club in 2018. He went 18-4 in 27 starts last year and turned in a 2.31 ERA, 1.5 BB/9 and 10.4 SO/9 over 175 innings. He suffered his fair share of bumps and bruises along the way, including a lower back strain that required a five-week stay on the disabled list.

The Dodgers will open their season against the Giants on Thursday, March 29 at 7:08 PM ET. Given the sudden rash of injuries that hit the Giants’ rotation earlier today, Kershaw’s Opening Day opponent has not yet been announced.