Death to Runners in Scoring Position Batting Averages

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Matt Snyder of CBS Sports.com addresses one of my biggest annoyances: announcers who spend tons of time talking about how the team they’re covering hits with runners in scoring position. Hit even harder: batting average with two outs and runners in scoring position. The target of his ire was Reds announcer Thom Brennaman, who mentioned this stat with respect to Joey Votto a lot. Read the column for some good stuff about how there’s a subtle — or sometimes not-so-subtle — criticism of player character and clutch-a-bility and all of that when it comes to RISP stats.

I get annoyed when hear this from announcers too. It’s right up there with their fetish for hitters which go the other way. You never hear about hitters who pull the ball with extreme effectiveness. You rarely hear about guys simply being great hitters, full stop.  That opposite-field hitting an RISP stuff is basically an announcer say “listen as I analyze the hell out of this game for you.”

Not that it’s entirely useless. It’s just misused. RISP numbers are things that actually happen in the world. And when used as an explanation for what happens in the past tense, fine, it does tell us that a team or player missed out on some opportunities. But it doesn’t have predictive value. It doesn’t speak to ability at all, actually. Just chance and stuff happening.  If the broadcaster can walk that fine line, great. But it’s so rare that they can.

Report: Mets have discussed a Matt Harvey trade with at least two teams

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Kristie Ackert of the New York Daily News reports that the Mets have discussed a trade involving starter Matt Harvey with at least two teams. Apparently, the Mets were even willing to move Harvey for a reliever.

The Mets tendered Harvey a contract on December 1. He’s entering his third and final year of arbitration eligibility and will likely see a slight bump from last season’s salary of $5.125 million. As a result, there was some thought going into late November that the Mets would non-tender Harvey.

Harvey, 28, made 18 starts and one relief appearance last year and had horrendous results. He put up a 6.70 ERA with a 67/47 K/BB ratio in 92 2/3 innings. Between his performance, his impending free agency, and his injury history, the Mets aren’t likely to get much back in return for Harvey. Even expecting a reliever in return may be too lofty.

Along with bullpen help, the Mets also need help at second base, first base, and the outfield. They don’t have many resources with which to address those needs. Ackert described the Mets’ resources as “a very limited stash of prospects” and “limited payroll space.”