Chris Carpenter: “It wasn’t what I was looking for”

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Cardinals right-hander Chris Carpenter allowed four earned runs on nine hits and two walks over 3 1/3 innings on Saturday evening with the Triple-A Memphis Redbirds. It was his second minor league rehab start and he looked even worse than he did in his rough debut last week at Double-A Springfield.

Carpenter spoke to reporters — including Joe Strauss of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch — right after Saturday’s outing and acknowledged a feeling of disappointment about his lack of effectiveness:

“I have a long way to go before I can get outs up there,” Carpenter said. “If I can’t get outs down here, never mind getting outs up there. I didn’t feel like I was as sharp as I needed to be or should have been. It wasn’t what I was looking for.

It’s not fair to the ballclub. It’s not fair to our team. It’s not fair to our fans. The name on my shirt and whatever I’ve done in the past doesn’t give me a free pass to go out and take somebody’s job up there. If I’m not going to help, I’m not to go up there and embarrass myself. I’ll tell you that right now. I’ve got to get sharper — bottom line.”

Carpenter has experienced no shoulder discomfort and his fastball has been clocked as high as 95 mph, but his stuff overall has not been sharp. 10 of the last 14 hitters he faced on Saturday night reached base.

Joe Kelly will continue acting as St. Louis’ fifth starter. Carlos Martinez and Michael Wacha are options.

David DeJesus retires

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Outfielder David DeJesus announced his retirement from Major League Baseball on Twitter Wednesday afternoon. He’ll be joining CSN Chicago for Cubs coverage.

DeJesus, 37, spent 13 seasons in the big leagues from 2003-15 with the Royals, Athletics, Cubs, Nationals, Rays, and Angels. He hit a composite .275/.349/.512 with 99 home runs and 573 RBI across 5,916 plate appearances.

We wish the best of luck to DeJesus as he begins a new career in sports media.

Dallas Green: 1934-2017

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Former major league pitcher, manager, and front office executive Dallas Green has died at the age of 82, Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports reports.

Green pitched for the Phillies for the first five years of his career from 1960-64, then went to the Washington Sentators, the Mets, and back to the Phillies before retiring after the ’67 season. He managed the Phillies from 1979-81, leading them to the organization’s first ever championship in ’80. The Cubs hired Green after the 1981 season to serve as executive vice president and general manager. He quit after the ’87 season. Green briefly managed the Yankees in ’89, then took the helm of the Mets from ’93-96.

Green was a controversial figure during his managing and GM days as he was not afraid to say exactly what he was thinking. He got into many conflicts with his players and coaches, but some think it helped the Phillies in the World Series in 1980. The Phillies inducted him into their Wall of Fame in 2006.