Erik Bedard allows no hits in 6.1 innings, loses anyway

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Astros lefty Erik Bedard brought a no-hitter into the seventh inning, but ran into a bit of trouble and a high pitch count. After Bedard walked Justin Smoak with one out (Bedard’s fifth walk of the evening), manager Bo Porter wasn’t willing to let him go beyond 111 pitches, replacing him with Jose Cisnero. Cisnero ran into a bit of trouble himself after recording the second out, walking Mike Zunino, then allowing the Mariners their first hit, a Michael Saunders two-run double that landed on Tal’s Hill.

Mariners starter Hisashi Iwakuma threw a scoreless seventh, Charlie Furbush tossed a scoreless eighth, and Tom Wilhelmsen nailed down the 4-2 victory in the ninth inning. Bedard becomes the ninth pitcher since 1901 to go at least six innings, allow no hits, and receive a loss. The last pitcher to do it was Jered Weaver in 2008 against the Dodgers.

Player Date Tm Opp Rslt App,Dec IP H R ER
Jered Weaver 2008-06-28 LAA LAD L 0-1 GS-6 ,L 6.0 0 1 0
Matt Young 1992-04-12 (1) BOS CLE L 1-2 CG 8 ,L 8.0 0 2 2
Andy Hawkins 1990-07-01 NYY CHW L 0-4 CG 8 ,L 8.0 0 4 0
Don Wilson 1974-09-04 HOU CIN L 1-2 GS-8 ,L 8.0 0 2 0
Clay Kirby 1970-07-21 SDP NYM L 0-3 GS-8 ,L 8.0 0 1 1
Steve Barber 1967-04-30 (1) BAL DET L 1-2 GS-9 ,L 8.2 0 2 1
Ken Johnson 1964-04-23 HOU CIN L 0-1 CG 9 ,L 9.0 0 1 0
Bob Shawkey 1917-07-04 (2) NYY WSH L 4-5 7.0 0 1 0
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
Generated 7/20/2013.

Also of note, Kyle Seager’s 15-game hitting streak came to an end, as did the Mariners’ streak of 23 consecutive games with a home run.

Imagine the Cleveland baseball club in green

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Everyone talks about getting rid of Chief Wahoo but nobody does anything about it.

Well, that’s not totally true. As we’ve noted, Major League Baseball and the Indians are slowly doing something about it. But the thing they’re doing — a slow phase-out of Wahoo, hopefully in a manner no one really notices — is likely going to anger just as many as it pleases. Such is the nature of a compromise. Such is the nature of trying to do the right thing but being afraid to state the reason why they’re doing it.

A bold move would be a lot more interesting. Not just getting rid of the logo, but totally rebranding the Indians in a cool and exciting way that would inspire people to buy in to the new team identity as opposed to merely lament or accept the abandonment of the old one. To that end, a man named Nick Kendall came up with a super fun and super great-looking redesign and rebranding of the Indians over the weekend.

Kendall, who is not really a big baseball fan but who has spent a lot of time thinking about uniforms and design, went back to 1871 and Cleveland’s first professional baseball team, the Forest Citys (yes, that’s how it was spelled). He took their logo — an interlocked F and C — and built an entire set of uniforms out of it and some aesthetic choices of his own. The new color scheme is a dark green and white. He even includes two alternate, solid-jersey designs. All of it is done in a great looking mockup. Really, go check it out and tell me that’s not cool.

I like it for a couple of reasons. Mostly because the uniforms just look fantastic. I love the design and would love to see a team with that kind of look in the game. We have too many reds and blues. Green is woefully underused in Major League Baseball and it’d be good to see some more green around.

Also, as Kendall notes, and as soccer shows us, the “[city] [mascot]” name construction isn’t the only way to approach team names, and so the name — Forest Citys, or some derivation of it — would be unique in baseball. Maybe it’s be “The Cleveland Forest Citys/Cities.”  Maybe “Forest City B.C.” would be a way to go? Maybe, as so often happened with baseball teams in the past — the Indians included — the nickname could develop over time. It’s certainly preferable to the option a lot of people point to — The Cleveland Spiders — which (a) evokes the worst baseball team in history’ and (b) sounds like something a 1990s NBA marketing team would come up with.

If the Indians are going to get rid of Chief Wahoo — and they are — why not do something fun and new and exciting?