Erik Bedard allows no hits in 6.1 innings, loses anyway

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Astros lefty Erik Bedard brought a no-hitter into the seventh inning, but ran into a bit of trouble and a high pitch count. After Bedard walked Justin Smoak with one out (Bedard’s fifth walk of the evening), manager Bo Porter wasn’t willing to let him go beyond 111 pitches, replacing him with Jose Cisnero. Cisnero ran into a bit of trouble himself after recording the second out, walking Mike Zunino, then allowing the Mariners their first hit, a Michael Saunders two-run double that landed on Tal’s Hill.

Mariners starter Hisashi Iwakuma threw a scoreless seventh, Charlie Furbush tossed a scoreless eighth, and Tom Wilhelmsen nailed down the 4-2 victory in the ninth inning. Bedard becomes the ninth pitcher since 1901 to go at least six innings, allow no hits, and receive a loss. The last pitcher to do it was Jered Weaver in 2008 against the Dodgers.

Player Date Tm Opp Rslt App,Dec IP H R ER
Jered Weaver 2008-06-28 LAA LAD L 0-1 GS-6 ,L 6.0 0 1 0
Matt Young 1992-04-12 (1) BOS CLE L 1-2 CG 8 ,L 8.0 0 2 2
Andy Hawkins 1990-07-01 NYY CHW L 0-4 CG 8 ,L 8.0 0 4 0
Don Wilson 1974-09-04 HOU CIN L 1-2 GS-8 ,L 8.0 0 2 0
Clay Kirby 1970-07-21 SDP NYM L 0-3 GS-8 ,L 8.0 0 1 1
Steve Barber 1967-04-30 (1) BAL DET L 1-2 GS-9 ,L 8.2 0 2 1
Ken Johnson 1964-04-23 HOU CIN L 0-1 CG 9 ,L 9.0 0 1 0
Bob Shawkey 1917-07-04 (2) NYY WSH L 4-5 7.0 0 1 0
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
Generated 7/20/2013.

Also of note, Kyle Seager’s 15-game hitting streak came to an end, as did the Mariners’ streak of 23 consecutive games with a home run.

Twins activated Glen Perkins from the 60-day disabled list

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The Twins announced, prior to the start of Thursday afternoon’s game against the Indians (the first game of a double-header), that reliever Glen Perkins was activated from the 60-day disabled list. Perkins had been sidelined since April 2016, recovering from left labrum surgery.

From 2013-15, Perkins served as the Twins’ closer, recording 102 saves with a 3.08 ERA. He appeared in only two games last season before going down with the injury.

Perkins appeared in the ninth inning of the first game Thursday with the Twins trailing 7-3. It did not go well. He gave up two runs on two hits, one walk, and two hit batsmen before being lifted. Alan Busenitz came in and induced an inning-ending double play from Francisco Lindor.

The Twins will likely ease Perkins back by continuing to use him in lower-leverage situations. Perkins has a club option worth $6.5 million for 2018 with a $700,000 buyout. The Twins picking up that option likely hinges on how Perkins fares down the stretch.

Red Sox owner John Henry “haunted” by Tom Yawkey’s racist past, wants to rename Yawkey Way

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The Boston Herald’s Michael Silverman reports that Red Sox owner John Henry is “haunted” by the racist past of previous owner Tom Yawkey and wants to rename Yawkey Way, the tw0-block street that runs from Brookline Avenue to Boylston Street.

Earlier this year, the Red Sox renamed an extension of Yawkey Way after David Ortiz.

Yawkey refused to promote black players from the minor leagues during the 1950’s despite exceptional performance. The Red Sox became the last major league team to integrate in 1959 when Pumpsie Green was added to the roster. Jackie Robinson, who broke the color barrier in 1947, called Yawkey “one of the most bigoted guys in baseball.”

This comes days after racial tensions in Charlottesville, VA where protesters and counter-protesters clashed over removing the statue of Robert E. Lee. A member of a white supremacist group drove his car into a crowd of counter-protesters, killing one and injuring 19. While President Trump has done little in the way of disavowing these hate groups, various city leaders have taken the initiative to remove Confederate monuments and the various other ways in which those people have been glorified. Baltimore, for example, removed four Confederate monuments early Wednesday morning.

Renaming Yawkey Way has been a long time coming and with the current political climate, Henry has finally been motivated enough to take action. He said, “I discussed this a number of times with the previous mayoral administration and they did not want to open what they saw as a can of worms. There are a number of buildings and institutions that bear the same name. The sale of the Red Sox by John Harrington helped to fund a number of very good works in the city done by the Yawkey Foundation (we had no control over where any monies were spent). The Yawkey Foundation has done a lot of great things over the years that have nothing to do with our history.”

Henry added, “The Red Sox don’t control the naming or renaming of streets. But for me, personally, the street name has always been a consistent reminder that it is our job to ensure the Red Sox are not just multi-cultural, but stand for as many of the right things in our community as we can – particularly in our African-American community and in the Dominican community that has embraced us so fully. The Red Sox Foundation and other organizations the Sox created such as Home Base have accomplished a lot over the last 15 years, but I am still haunted by what went on here a long time before we arrived.”

Henry says if the decision were entirely up to him, he would dedicate the street to David Ortiz, calling it “David Ortiz Way” or “Big Papi Way.”

Though racism is a problem throughout the U.S., racism has been a particular problem in Boston at least when it comes to baseball. Earlier this year, Orioles outfielder Adam Jones had peanuts thrown at him and was called racist slurs by fans at Fenway Park. Red Sox starter David Price said he has been on the receiving end of racist taunts from Boston fans as well. After the Jones incident, other players — including CC Sabathia, Barry Bonds, Mark McLemore, and Jackie Bradley, Jr. — spoke up and said that they had been treated similarly at Fenway Park.

Henry’s sensitivity to the issue is quite understandable. And he deserves kudos for doing the right thing in pushing to rename Yawkey Way, but one has to wonder why this hadn’t been done much, much sooner.