Michael Weiner: the union will try to persuade clearly guilty Biogenesis players to take a plea

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Please adjust your “the players union is only interested in protecting drug cheats” rhetoric appropriately. Because as Michael Weiner told the New York Daily News yesterday, that’s not the m.o. of his union with respect to the Biogenesis stuff:

“I can tell you, if we have a case where there really is overwhelming evidence, that a player committed a violation of the program, our fight is going to be that they make a deal,” Weiner said without referring to specific players. “We’re not interested in having players with overwhelming evidence that they violated the (drug) program out there. Most of the players aren’t interested in that. We’d like to have a clean program.”

One should assume that Weiner and the MLBPA will fight cases with which there are legitimate disputes as to culpability, and one should also assume that they will defend the due process rights of everyone involved, but the days where it’s 100% scorched-Earth between the league and the union are a long way in the rear-view mirror, so it shouldn’t be surprising that Weiner is taking a pragmatic approach here as well.

The interesting question will be if a player falls under Weiner’s “overwhelming evidence” category and still decides to fight. I presume he’d do so with his own legal team. And I presume the union would be issuing lots of awkward statements trying to both distance itself from the defense and respect the process.  But that will sure be hard after these statements.

Watch: George Springer robs Todd Frazier with an incredible catch at the wall

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Perhaps there are a few who still miss the slope of Tal’s Hill rising from center field, but George Springer isn’t one of them. He lassoed a 403-foot fly ball from Todd Frazier in the seventh inning of Game 6, reaching nearly to the top of the wall to prevent the Yankees from gaining on the Astros’ 3-0 lead.

According to Statcast, a fly ball with an exit velocity of 103.6 MPH and a launch angle of 29 degrees lands for a home run 72% of the time. That wasn’t going to fly with the Astros, who were facing runners on first and second with one out and saw Justin Verlander‘s pitch count rapidly approaching 100.

It wasn’t long before the Yankees tried for another home run, however, and this one sailed far above the heads of all of the Astros’ outfielders. Aaron Judge lofted a 425-foot shot to left field in the eighth inning, destroying a first-pitch fastball from Brad Peacock and finally getting New York on the board.

The Yankees currently trail the Astros 4-1 in the bottom of the eighth.