Yoenis Cespedes wins the 2013 Home Run Derby

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The winner of the Home Run Derby isn’t even an All-Star. But he’s here and his presence was validated: Yoenis Cespedes has won the 2013 Home Run Derby.

Cespedes hit 9 homers in the final round — his last traveling 455 feet — beating out Bryce Harper who had eight. Cespedes had 32 in all to Harper’s 24. In the team competition the the AL beat the NL 53 to 50. Cespedes did not have to use up all ten of his allotted outs in the second round. If he had, the AL — and Cespedes — likely would have had higher totals.

Harper was nothing if not consistent, hitting eight homers in each of the three rounds, but Cespedes seemed to have an entirely different gear tonight. His final round homers finding parts of the park that no competitor had found all night.

And so we have survived another Home Run Derby. They are fun for a while, then get a little tedious. But it was nice for once to see a competitor seem to grow stronger as the night went on rather than have the final round be somewhat anti-climactic. Oh, and it ended with Cespedes being awarded a brand new Chevy Silverado. So that’s nice for him.

That’s it from Citi Field for today. It’s been a long day of meet-and-greets, promotional events and weird exhibitions. Tomorrow we get the reason we’re all here: the All-Star Game.  Keep a window open with HardballTalk and NBCSports.com all day, as we’ll be hitting you with our best shots from morning until late in the night.

Each owner will get at least $50 million in early 2018 from the sale of BAMTech

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Earlier this year Disney agreed to purchase the majority stake in BAMTech, the digital media company spun off from MLB Advanced Media. We know it as the source of the technology for MLB.tv and MLB.com, but it’s far more wide-ranging than that now. At present it powers streaming for MLB, HBO, NHL, WWE, and, eventually, will power Disney’s and ESPN’s upcoming streaming services.

The company was started by an investment from baseball’s 30 owners, so they’re getting a big payout as a result of the acquisition. Earlier this morning Jim Bowden dropped this regarding how much of that payout is in the offing in the short term:

That’s probably on the low end, actually. Some people I’ve spoken to who are familiar with the acquisition say the figure is more like $68 million in Q1 of 2018.

Good for the owners! It was a savvy, forward-thinking investment that, in the past, baseball owners might not have made. Bud Selig, Bob Bowman and others deserve credit for convincing the Jeff Lorias and Jerry Reinsdorfs of the world to think big and long term. It’s money out of the sky, raining down upon the owner of your baseball team for, basically, doing nothing.

Money which should be remembered when your buddy complains about a relief pitcher getting $6 million for only pitching 65 innings. Money which should be remembered when your team’s GM says that he has to cut back on payroll in the coming year.