A-Rod’s camp denies the 150-game plea bargain discussion report

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Yesterday the New York Daily News reported that A-Rod and Major League Baseball were discussing a plea deal that would land him a 150-game suspension in lieu of gambling over a potential lifetime ban in the event he took an appeal of any Biogenesis-related discipline to arbitration. The report described a shaken A-Rod following his meeting with Major League Baseball on Friday.

Later in the day, however, his team denied the report:

 

We’re into he-said, he-said land. Or he-said, he-didn’t-say. It’s pretty impossible to know what’s really going on here given all of the agendas at play. MLB is obviously getting tough and is trying to send messages, but they also want to be seen being tough and sending a message, so it may lend itself to leaks and reports that aren’t exactly on the mark. Meanwhile, A-Rod and other players want to defend themselves — and to be seen as defending themselves so that maybe players don’t think they’re wavering — but they could still be trying to mitigate the fallout if MLB’s case against them is strong.

The most significant thing about plea deal talk? The idea that there can be plea deals in the context of a drug testing/punishment regime that is supposed to be an exercise in zero-tolerance and mechanical justice. A program that isn’t supposed to be about negotiation and leverage because such things introduce uncertainty into a program that isn’t supposed to carry any, by design.

Maybe the unique circumstances of the Biogenesis case necessitate that. But I feel like baseball’s drug program is going to be permanently affected by what transpires before this is all said and done.

Yoenis Cespedes blames a lack of golf for his early season slump

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Back during the 2015 playoffs the sorts of New York media types who love to find reasons to criticize players for petty reasons decided to criticize Yoenis Cespedes for playing golf the day of a playoff game. The Mets won the series with the Cubs during which the controversy, such as it was, occurred and it was soon dropped.

It was picked back up again in 2016 when Cespedes, while on the disabled list with a strained quad, was seen playing golf. Despite the fact that everyone involved said that golf did not contribute to his injury and that golf would have no impact on his injured quad, it was deemed “a bad look” by a columnist looking to get some mileage out of bashing Cespedes for having a hobby that probably half of all ballplayers share. They did it when he showed off his fancy cars too, by the way, even though just about every ballplayer has a fancy car or three. When you’re a superstar in New York — especially when you’re one with whom the media is not particularly close for various reasons — you’re going to catch hell for seemingly nothing.

Now there’s a new twist to the Cespedes golf saga. Yoenis himself says that his poor start — he’s hitting .195/.258/.354 and leads the league in strikeouts — is due to . . . not enough golf! From the New York Times:

He gave a possible reason for the poor start this weekend: not playing enough golf, a hobby beloved by many baseball players. And, yes, he is serious.

“In previous seasons, one of the things I did when I wasn’t going well was to play golf,” he said after a game on Friday in which he struck out four times but still drove in the go-ahead run in the 12th inning. “This year, I’m not playing golf.”

The story says Cespedes quit golf last summer because he worried that it was contributing to hamstring problems. He’s thinking about going back to it soon, as he thinks it’ll help his swing. Given that he’ll catch hell either way, he may as well do what he wants.