Terry Collins wants Pirates fans to “reevaluate”

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The Home Run Derby created some unexpected drama when Mets third baseman David Wright picked childhood friend Michael Cuddyer over Pirates third baseman Pedro Alvarez. This caught the ire of Pirates fans, who felt that Alvarez was much more deserving of a selection. On Thursday, Cuddyer’s teammate and fellow Derby participant Carlos Gonzalez bowed out due to a sprained right middle finger. Alvarez took his spot, at long last.

On Friday, the Mets opened up a three-game series in Pittsburgh against the Pirates to wrap up the first half. Though Alvarez was in the Derby, Pirates fans jeered Wright with varying degrees of enthusiasm throughout the weekend. This upset Mets manager Terry Collins, who insists Pirates fans “better reevaluate what’s going on”.

Via Rob Biertempfel:

“When you start booing David Wright, you better re-evaluate what’s going on,” Collins said after the Mets’ 4-2 win. “Because there’s nobody who plays the game any harder or who epitomizes what you want a major league player to be than David Wright, for heaven’s sakes.”

Collins is making a mountain out of a molehill here, as Wright never really had a full cascade of heckling the way Robinson Cano did last year from Kansas City fans. Cano had passed over Butler last year as the captain of the AL Derby squad. As the host of the All-Star Game festivities were held at Kaufmann Stadium, Butler’s home ballpark, Cano was lustily booed before he took his cuts in last year’s Derby, in which he went homerless. Wright has heard much, much worse from fans in Philadelphia and in the Bronx.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.