Brett Lawrie activated from disabled list, will play second base in return

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After missing six weeks with a sprained left ankle, Brett Lawrie was activated from the disabled list today by the Blue Jays. Derek Wetmore of MLB.com reports that he will play second base in his return this afternoon against the Orioles, confirming what was hinted by Blue Jays manager John Gibbons on Thursday.

Lawrie batted .250 (8-for-32) with one home run and a 10/7 K/BB ratio over 10 minor league rehab games. The 23-year-old started at second base in each of his final three games with Triple-A Buffalo. While he has exclusively played third base in the majors, he began his professional career at second base with the Brewers.

Lawrie hasn’t played regularly at second base since back in 2010, so he’s no lock to stick at the position, but the Blue Jays are ready to see if he can form a dynamic double-play combo with shortstop Jose Reyes. Maicer Izturis figures to get most of the starts at third base while Mark DeRosa and Edwin Encarnacion could also see occasional playing time there. Jose Bautista has made two starts at third base this season, but Gibbons told John Lott of the National Post that they have no plans to move him from right field.

Yankees sign Adam Lind to a minor league deal. Again.

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The Yankees signed Adam Lind to a minor league deal this past offseason. Then they released him during spring training. Now they have signed him to another minor league deal. He’ll report to extended spring training where he’ll now try not to get extended released.

Lind is a platoon guy with little defensive value, but he hit .303/.362/.513 with 14 home runs and 59 RBI in 301 plate appearances for the Nationals last season, serving as a pinch-hitter and backup first baseman and outfielder. The injury to Greg Bird and the impending suspension of Tyler Austin — he’s currently on appeal — will likely give him at least some opportunity to show that he’s still a big leaguer.

Which, yeah, he probably still is. Or at least would be if teams didn’t have 13 and 14-man pitching staffs and actually had room for a couple of bench position players. Such is not the current game of baseball, however.