Happy Anniversary Disco Demolition Night

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I have no idea how we all survived the 1970s. Everything about that decade encouraged anarchy. Often times nearly forced it.  If I told you that in 1978 there was a “Kill the Person Next to You With Your Bare Hands Night” at a major league ballpark and that everyone thought it would be a good idea at the time, but boy howdy, it just got out of hand somehow, you’d probably believe it because it was so fitting for the time. That’s just how we rolled in Ford and Carter’s America.

Of the disasters that actually did happen, I still think Ten Cent Beer Night was the greatest fiasco. I mean, what did anyone think was going to happen? But Disco Demolition Night is a worthy challenger to that crown. It occurred 34 years ago today.

In a suitable signpost for the end of the absolutely insane 1970s, a Chicago DJ named Steve Dahl achieved infamy during a doubleheader between the White Sox and Tigers. The backlash against disco had reached its apex. Dahl convinced the White Sox to stage a promotion for which people would bring unwanted disco records to the game in exchange for a 98 cent ticket. The records were to be collected and placed in center field where they were to be blown up — actually blown up — during the intermission between the two games. Fun would be had by all, Dahl and the White Sox thought. What actually happened?  A riot, of course.

Which, today anyway, we probably could have seen coming. You combine cheap tickets, a promotion which, by its nature, attracted people who were not into simply dancing and having a good time, the promise of actual violence in the form of an explosion and the fact that no one really controlled beer sales in those days, and it makes perfect sense that chaos ensued. Back in 1979, however, people just didn’t think things through like that, God love ’em.

There was not enough room in the collection boxes — Dahl, the organizer, assumed maybe 10,000 people would show up but more than 50,000 did — so many just brought their records into the ballpark and started throwing them on the field. Then the explosion happened. It tore a big chunk out of the outfield grass. Then thousands of fans rushed the field, lighting fires, throwing firecrackers, and making general asses of themselves. The batting cage was pulled down and wrecked, bases were ripped off the infield, and the place was generally torn to shreds before riot police showed up.

Watch some of the local news coverage from the event. And, before wondering how this could all happen, ask yourself the first question that occurred to me: did men simply not wear shirts in the 1970s? Was there some law against it? Because in 100% of the footage I have ever seen from the 1970s, all men were shirtless. Including Nixon’s resignation speech, all episodes of the Michael Douglas Show and the Bicentennial celebrations:

Video: Bryce Harper crushes a home run to the Chase Field concourse

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Aaron Judge may be the talk of the town right now, but let’s not forget some of Major League Baseball’s more established sluggers. Take the Nationals’ Bryce Harper, for instance, who jumped on a full count during the first inning of Saturday’s game and postmarked the ball to the center field concourse in Chase Field.

Harper’s mammoth hit was the first career home run allowed by Diamondbacks’ rookie Anthony Banda. Banda quickly recovered with an inning-ending strikeout to Ryan Zimmerman, but was booted from his big league debut after Harper, Zimmerman and Anthony Rendon combined for a three-run spread in the sixth.

The first-inning homer also served another purpose: it extended Harper’s hitting streak to 15 games, the longest current streak in MLB this season. He’ll need four more games to tie the 19-game streak Royals’ infielder/outfielder Whit Merrifield established back in June.

The Nationals currently lead the Diamondbacks 4-2 in the bottom of the seventh inning.

Chi Chi Gonzalez to undergo Tommy John surgery

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Rangers’ right-hander Chi Chi Gonzalez is slated for Tommy John surgery, according to a report by Evan Grant of the Dallas Morning News. Gonzalez was placed on the 60-day disabled list back in early April with a partial UCL tear and was working towards a throwing program before getting sidelined with more elbow pain. He’s expected to miss the entirety of the 2018 season while recovering from the surgery.

This is the second straight season that has been derailed for Gonzalez due to injury. The 25-year-old starter pitched just 10 1/3 innings in 2016 after recovering from a torn UCL, and was optioned to Triple-A Round Rock to finish out the year after compiling an 8.71 ERA, 7.8 BB/9 and 6.1 SO/9 in three starts with the club. He showed more promise in Triple-A with a 4.70 ERA, 2.9 BB/9 and 5.9 SO/9 through 24 starts and 138 innings.

It’s a tough blow for the Rangers, who have seen Gonzalez healthy in just one major league season to date. General manager Jon Daniels told reporters that a recent MRI showed signs of weakening in the ligament, which disrupted the team’s plans to have the right-hander stick to a six- to eight-week recovery timetable after getting a platelet-rich plasma injection (via Stefan Stevenson of the Fort Worth Star-Telegram). The surgery is expected to take place next week and will put Gonzalez’s earliest return date sometime in September 2018.