Columnist calls for enhanced drug testing, chooses to discredit results of drug testing

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Christine Brennan’s latest column for USA Today decries the fact that Bartolo Colon is in the All-Star Game. Why? Because he tested positive for PEDs last year:

Colon, and every other performance-enhancing drug user in baseball, should never be allowed to become an All-Star, or win any MLB award. No Cy Young, no MVP, no batting title, no nothing. It doesn’t matter that he was caught and suspended last year, not this year. (Although with the reported Biogenesis suspensions still looming, the year is young.) The bottom line is, you don’t suddenly become a non-cheater once your suspension is over.

It’s her right to believe that someone who cheats once must always be cheating, regardless of what the drug tests say. But it is curious coming from Brennan, because for at least six years now her PED hobby horse has been all about getting Major League Baseball to adopt the USADA’s drug testing regime. How one can call for enhanced testing while simultaneously dismissing the results of drug testing (and while failing to point out how MLB’s drug testing program is lacking) is a neat trick, but I guess I can’t understand it given that I’m not a trained journalist living in a major city.

But the worst part of this column is how it completely misrepresents the role of the union with respect to baseball’s drug problem. Brennan says:

Because as much as MLB’s leaders try to clean up their game, the players’ union lags years behind, fighting harder for the cheaters than it does for the players the cheaters shove off All-Star teams and awards dinner stages, and out of record books … Why the players’ union doesn’t speak out for people like [Matt] Moore is mystifying. It will fight harder for Colon and his alleged Biogenesis buddies — Nelson Cruz, Jhonny Peralta, Everth Cabrera, Ryan Braun, Alex Rodriguez, et. al. — than it ever will for the poor non-cheating players who continue to quietly accept their fate.

She may have had a point a decade ago when the union was still hostile to drug testing, but she’s completely ignoring current reality. On multiple occasions over the past several years the union has agreed to stiffer drug testing penalties and enhanced testing. Indeed, just this past winter they ratcheted things up significantly adding unannounced HGH testing and testosterone baseline tests, the likes of which Brennan herself has long called for. That baseline testing, by the way, is being supervised by the WADA, which Brennan said in 2007 must get involved and which she herself considered to be the gold standard of anti-doping efforts. Moving goalposts is hard work, of course, so maybe she was just distracted and forgot that she wrote that column.

She is also ignoring the fact that every public statement the union makes on drug matters acknowledges the importance of the drug testing program. And that players and the union have repeatedly and increasingly given voice to their desire for a clean game and the protection of players who do not use performance enhancing drugs.

All of that would get in the way of a good, outraged column, of course. So I totally understand why she ignores it.

Jered Weaver dealing with “dead arm”

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Padres starter Jered Weaver lasted just two-thirds of an inning in Wednesday afternoon’s Cactus League appearance against the Royals. He yielded four runs on three hits, throwing 31 pitches before getting pulled. His spring ERA now sits at an ugly 10.13.

Weaver said he’s been dealing with a “dead arm” since his last bullpen session, but added he’s dealt with the issue in previous springs, Dennis Lin of the San Diego Union-Tribune reports.

The Padres signed Weaver to a one-year, $3 million contract last month. The right-hander is coming off of the worst season of his 11-year career. His fastball averaged a career-low 83 MPH and he put up a 5.06 ERA with a 103/51 K/BB ratio in 178 innings.

Ian Kinsler doesn’t think Puerto Rico or Dominican Republic players play the game the right way

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Update: Whoops…

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Earlier, Craig wrote about Dan Duquette’s dogwhistle language in his criticism of Blue Jays outfielder Jose Bautista. We have some more dogwhistling, this time coming from Tigers (and Team U.S.) second baseman Ian Kinsler. Via Billy Witz of The New York Times:

I hope kids watching the W.B.C. can watch the way we play the game and appreciate the way we play the game as opposed to the way Puerto Rico plays or the Dominican plays. That’s not taking anything away from them. That just wasn’t the way we were raised. They were raised differently and to show emotion and passion when you play. We do show emotion; we do show passion. But we just do it in a different way.

The goal of the World Baseball Classic, created by Major League Baseball, is to promote baseball across the globe. It’s players like Puerto Rico’s Javier Baez who are doing the best job in that regard, not boring white guys from the U.S. Potential baseball fans are not swayed into liking the sport when a player hits a home run and solemnly puts his head down to stroll the bases. They get excited and energized when players show emotion, flip their bats, celebrate. Baez did more to make baseball appeal to new and lapsed audiences with his premature celebration tag than the entire U.S. team has done this tournament.

Furthermore, it is hypocritical to want to diversify the sport’s audience while squelching incoming cultures.

Jim Leyland also got in on the action:

Go Puerto Rico.