Ricky Nolasco will make Dodgers debut on Tuesday; Chris Capuano moved to bullpen

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From beat writer Ken Gurnick of MLB.com comes word that right-hander Ricky Nolasco is scheduled to make his debut for the Dodgers on Tuesday night against the Diamondbacks at Arizona’s Chase Field.

It’ll be an important outing for Nolasco, who was acquired on Saturday evening from the Marlins in exchange for minor league pitchers Steve Ames, Josh Wall, and and Angel Sanchez. The Dodgers are currently trailing the D’Backs by only 4 1/2 games in the National League West standings and will be looking to make up even more ground during this week’s crucial three-game set in Phoenix.

Nolasco had a 3.85 ERA, 1.22 WHIP and 90/25 K/BB ratio through 112 1/3 innings this season with Miami.

To clear a spot for him in the starting rotation, the Dodgers moved left-hander Chris Capuano to the bullpen.

Each owner will get at least $50 million in early 2018 from the sale of BAMTech

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Earlier this year Disney agreed to purchase the majority stake in BAMTech, the digital media company spun off from MLB Advanced Media. We know it as the source of the technology for MLB.tv and MLB.com, but it’s far more wide-ranging than that now. At present it powers streaming for MLB, HBO, NHL, WWE, and, eventually, will power Disney’s and ESPN’s upcoming streaming services.

The company was started by an investment from baseball’s 30 owners, so they’re getting a big payout as a result of the acquisition. Earlier this morning Jim Bowden dropped this regarding how much of that payout is in the offing in the short term:

That’s probably on the low end, actually. Some people I’ve spoken to who are familiar with the acquisition say the figure is more like $68 million in Q1 of 2018.

Good for the owners! It was a savvy, forward-thinking investment that, in the past, baseball owners might not have made. Bud Selig, Bob Bowman and others deserve credit for convincing the Jeff Lorias and Jerry Reinsdorfs of the world to think big and long term. It’s money out of the sky, raining down upon the owner of your baseball team for, basically, doing nothing.

Money which should be remembered when your buddy complains about a relief pitcher getting $6 million for only pitching 65 innings. Money which should be remembered when your team’s GM says that he has to cut back on payroll in the coming year.