Clay Buchholz says he has “finally turned a corner” in his recovery from neck, shoulder pain

2 Comments

Evan Drellich, beat writer for MassLive.com, tells the story:

BOSTON — Maybe Clay Buchholz will need just one rehab start after all.

That’s a scenario the Red Sox right-hander suggested was possible Wednesday, on a day he said he felt like he had “finally turned a corner” in his recovery from right-shoulder bursitis. He threw from about 100 feet on flat ground, and would need to get to 120 feet before stepping on a mound.

“I feel like I am finally getting close to feeling pretty much normal now,” Buchholz told reporters following Wednesday afternoon’s 100-foot throwing session. “So the last few days of throwing are encouraging. I’m finally able to clear my head a little bit and go about it as just getting back to getting off the mound.”

Buchholz has not pitched in a game since June 8 due to neck and shoulder discomfort.

The hope is that he’ll be ready to return to the Red Sox rotation shortly after the All-Star break.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.