Homer Bailey becomes the 28th pitcher in major league history to throw multiple no-hitters

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The two most recent no-hit performances in Major League Baseball belong to Cincy’s Homer Bailey.

Bailey’s first, last September 28 at Pittsburgh’s PNC Park, required 115 pitches and played out in front of a small opposing crowd of yellow and black. The scene on Tuesday night was a little more special.

Bailey needed only 109 pitches to shut down the defending World Series-champion Giants in front of an intense and attentive but clearly nervous group of 27,000-plus fans at Great American Ball Park. He benefited from some nice defensive plays — one especially from Joey Votto — but yielded only a seventh-inning walk to Gregor Blanco and racked up nine strikeouts.

The last pitcher to own the two most recent no-hitters in the majors was Nolan Ryan (in 1974-1975).

Only 28 pitchers in history have thrown multiple no-hitters and just five (Cy Young, Sandy Koufax, Bob Feller, Larry Corcoran and Ryan) have thrown three or more. At 27 years old, Bailey has a shot to join that club.

The former No. 7 overall pick owns a 3.57 ERA, 1.06 WHIP and 111/26 K/BB ratio through 111 innings this season for third-place Reds. He is scheduled to face the light-hitting Mariners at home next time out.

Marlins intend to keep Christian Yelich

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With Giancarlo Stanton and Marcell Ozuna gone, the next logical step for the Marlins would be to trade away Christian Yelich. He’s be an amazingly attractive trade candidate given that he is under team control through 2022, and is owed a very reasonable $58 million or so. He just turned 26 last week and has hit .290/.369/.432 in his five year career. That’s the kind of player and contract that could bring back a mess of prospects.

Except the Marlins, it seems, don’t want to do that. Multiple reports have come out in the last hour saying that the Marlins intend to hold on to Yelich and to build around him.

That could be a negotiating ploy, of course. They’ll no doubt listen to offers and, if the right one comes along, they’d certainly give strong consideration to trading him. A good deal is a good deal.

The only question, in light of the events of the last week, is whether the Marlins would know a good deal if they saw one.