Scott Feldman

Cubs trade Feldman, Clevenger to Orioles for Arrieta, Strop, and international bonus money


Trading season is officially upon us, as Keith Law of reports that the Cubs have traded right-hander Scott Feldman and catcher Steve Clevenger to the Orioles for right-hander Pedro Strop, right-hander Jake Arrieta, and about $400,000 in international signing bonus slot amount.

It’s tough to have a good feel for how valuable the international bonus money tranfer is because there’s no real history of it to analyze, but for a rebuilding team like the Cubs anything that allows them to bring in more young talent certainly makes sense.

Feldman pitched well for Chicago, starting 15 games with a 3.46 ERA, and Baltimore was clearly in the market for veteran rotation help. It’s also worth noting that the Cubs signed Feldman to a one-year, $7 million deal as a free agent back in November, so they turned a modest short-term investment into what they hope will be some long-term value.

Arrieta was once a top prospect, but he’s been terrible in various big-league stints with a 5.46 ERA in 358 innings and is now 27 years old. Any notion of him developing into a top-of-the-rotation arm is probably long gone, but he may still be a useful starter or an interesting bullpen project. Strop figures to step into the Cubs’ bullpen in a middle relief role, where he’ll probably continue to struggle with control while flashing occasionally dominant raw stuff.

It’s an interesting trade, as the Cubs signed Feldman on the cheap and then flipped him for a former top prospect and a hard-throwing reliever, plus the ability to spend more on international prospects. Meanwhile, for the Orioles they obviously gave up on Arrieta ever living up to his potential and Strop was pretty expendable in the grand scheme of things, so they added a decent starter in Feldman for the second half without having to dip into their farm system.

Joe Girardi is not a fan of Game 162 scheduling

Joe Girardi
Getty Images

The Yankees fell behind early to the Orioles on Sunday afternoon, a day after dropping both ends of Saturday’s doubleheader. Their game, as did every other game on Sunday with the exception of the Braves-Cardinals doubleheader, started at 3:05 or 3:10 EDT, a change Major League Baseball recently made to create fairness on the final day of the season.

Girardi is not a fan. Per the Associated Press:

It was cloudy at Camden Yards at 3:05 p.m., but late-afternoon games often make it difficult for batters to see pitches.

Girardi said, “Here’s the thing that bothers me: If it’s a sunny day you’re playing in shadows.”

He added, “If it’s the most important game of the year to get in, I don’t think that’s right.”

Understanding the idea is for every team to play at the same time, Girardi said, “Then play all night games.”

One wonders if MLB had scheduled Sunday’s slate of games for the night, if Girardi would have instead complained about batters losing fly balls in the stadium lights. Furthermore, both teams have to play in the same conditions.

Video: Ichiro Suzuki pitches an inning for the Marlins

Ichiro Suzuki
AP Photo

Marlins outfielder Ichiro Suzuki was given an opportunity to play a new position in Sunday’s series finale against the Phillies. After the Phillies rallied to take a 6-2 lead in the seventh, the Marlins let Suzuki take the hill in the eighth. And, in news that surprises no one, he was impressive.

Though Suzuki gave up a run on two hits, he flashed a fastball that hit the mid-80’s and a breaking ball with some bite.

Suzuki, who turns 42 years old later this month, is 65 hits of 3,000 in his major league career. The Marlins are interested in bringing him back in 2016.