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MLB is still using its bogus civil suit against Anthony Bosch to collect evidence

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Most of you will say that all is fair when steroids are involved, but it’s still worth pointing out that MLB’s civil lawsuit against Anthony Bosch and Biogenesis — a suit which has basically zero legal merit and which isn’t really a contested lawsuit given that Bosch and MLB are now working together — is still active. And MLB is using it to discover evidence in its investigation of the Biogenesis players.

The latest: A-Rod’s famous cousin, Yuri Sucart, was in court yesterday challenging MLB’s right to take his deposition in the case. The Miami Herald reports on it. The upshot: Cousin Yuri argued that the state court lawsuit is invalid as a means of MLB vindicating its rights under the Collective Bargaining Agreement (remember: the suit is for alleged interference with that contract) because the Collective Bargaining Agreement is governed by federal law. The judge actually suggested that this argument is valid, but said that as a non-party Sucart can’t challenge it so he’ll have to appear at a deposition.

The judge also wondered why none of the actual defendants — like Tony Bosch — are challenging the suit on those grounds. Well, the answer is simple: it’s an essentially fake, non-contested lawsuit in which the primary defendants are  now on the same side as the plaintiffs so of course they’re not going to challenge it. It’s a sham and it should not exist, but no one seems to care.

We talked last week about the gloves-off, get-tough nature of MLB’s investigation. Whatever you think of that, let us not forget that part of it involves the misuse of the court system in an effort to handle its employee discipline and public relations problems.

Astros avoid arbitration with Mike Fiers

SEATTLE, WA - SEPTEMBER 17: Starting pitcher Mike Fiers #54 of the Houston Astros walks to the dugout after pitching an inning during a game against the Seattle Mariners at Safeco Field on September 17, 2016 in Seattle, Washington. The Astros won the game 2-1. (Photo by Stephen Brashear/Getty Images)
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The Astros avoided arbitration with pitcher Mike Fiers, agreeing on a $3.45 million salary for the 2017 season, per Jake Kaplan of the Houston Chronicle. The right-hander was in his first of three years of arbitration eligibility.

Fiers, 31, made 30 starts and one relief appearance for the Astros in 2016. He finished the year with a 4.48 ERA and a 134/42 K/BB ratio in 168 2/3 innings.

Fiers had a much better showing in 2015 as well as in limited action in 2014, so the Astros are hoping he rediscovers that effectiveness going forward. He’ll slot into the back of the starting rotation.

Raines to wear an Expos cap, Pudge to wear a Rangers cap on their Hall of Fame plaques

1990:  Outfielder Tim Raines of the Montreal Expos in action. Mandatory Credit: Otto Greule  /Allsport
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There is little if any controversy to be had about the caps this year’s inductees will wear on their Hall of Fame plaques, but in case there was any doubt at all, it was put to rest this afternoon at the Hall of Fame press conference: Tim Raines will wear a Montreal Expos cap and Ivan Rodriguez will wear a Rangers cap. Jeff Bagwell, of course, never played for a team other than the Houston Astros at the big league level.

Though Raines had some good seasons with the Chicago White Sox and though he helped provide a nice kick start to the Yankees dynasty in the mid-1990s, his best seasons, by far, took place while he was an Expo. It’s also the case that the bulk of his Hall of Fame push came from Expos fans. He was particularly boosted by Jonah Keri, who recently wrote a book detailing the history of the Expos. So, yeah, that’s easy.

Rodriguez played 13 of his 21 years with the Texas Rangers, including his MVP 1999 season. He did have some notable years elsewhere, particularly in Detroit where he remains a fan favorite, but it was always going to be the Rangers for him, one would think. Maybe a slight, slight chance that he’d do the blank cap thing, Greg Maddux-style, but smart money was on the Rangers.

With Bagwell, the only question is which Astros cap he’ll wear. There are a couple of applicable ones: the brick red star, which he wore to the World Series in 2005. There’s also the shooting star cap he wore during his best seasons and which Craig Biggio’s plaque displays. He was around for the classic “H” over the star look, but he was just a kid then, so I doubt he’d wear it.

Anyway, sorry to the Marlins fans who wished that Raines and Pudge would wear the fishy-F.