MLB is still using its bogus civil suit against Anthony Bosch to collect evidence

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Most of you will say that all is fair when steroids are involved, but it’s still worth pointing out that MLB’s civil lawsuit against Anthony Bosch and Biogenesis — a suit which has basically zero legal merit and which isn’t really a contested lawsuit given that Bosch and MLB are now working together — is still active. And MLB is using it to discover evidence in its investigation of the Biogenesis players.

The latest: A-Rod’s famous cousin, Yuri Sucart, was in court yesterday challenging MLB’s right to take his deposition in the case. The Miami Herald reports on it. The upshot: Cousin Yuri argued that the state court lawsuit is invalid as a means of MLB vindicating its rights under the Collective Bargaining Agreement (remember: the suit is for alleged interference with that contract) because the Collective Bargaining Agreement is governed by federal law. The judge actually suggested that this argument is valid, but said that as a non-party Sucart can’t challenge it so he’ll have to appear at a deposition.

The judge also wondered why none of the actual defendants — like Tony Bosch — are challenging the suit on those grounds. Well, the answer is simple: it’s an essentially fake, non-contested lawsuit in which the primary defendants are  now on the same side as the plaintiffs so of course they’re not going to challenge it. It’s a sham and it should not exist, but no one seems to care.

We talked last week about the gloves-off, get-tough nature of MLB’s investigation. Whatever you think of that, let us not forget that part of it involves the misuse of the court system in an effort to handle its employee discipline and public relations problems.

Mets invite Tim Tebow to spring training

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Tim Tebow isn’t letting go of his major league dreams just yet. The former NFL quarterback is slated to appear with the Mets during spring training this year, extending what initially looked like an ill-fated career choice for at least one more season. Per the club’s official announcement on Friday, he’ll join a group of spring training invitees that includes top-30 prospects like Peter Alonso, P.J. Conlon, Patrick Mazeika and David Thompson.

Tebow, 30, hasn’t taken to professional baseball as gracefully as expected. He batted a cumulative .226/.309/.347 with eight home runs and a .656 OPS in 486 plate appearances for Single-A Columbia and High-A St. Lucie in 2017. While that wasn’t enough to compel the Mets to give the aging outfielder a big league tryout, there’s no denying that Tebow brought substantial benefit to their minor league affiliates — in the form of increased attendance figures and ticket sales, that is.

Even after the Mets were booted from the NL East race last September, they resisted the idea of promoting Tebow for a late-season attendance boost of their own. That’s not to say they’re planning on taking the same approach in 2018; Tebow will undoubtedly get his cup of coffee in the majors at some point, but for now, a Grapefruit League tryout is likely as close as he’ll ever get to playing with the team’s big league roster on an everyday basis.