The Mariners will be the first team to fly a Gay Pride Flag at a game this Sunday

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It’s the time of the year when many cities hold their Pride parade and festivals, and Seattle’s honorary Pride parade is going on this Sunday. In honor of it the Seattle Mariners are going to raise the Pride Flag. They’ll be the first-ever baseball team to do so at a game. From Seattle Out & Proud:

While the Mariners play against the Chicago Cubs on Sunday June 30, Safeco Field will fly the rainbow Pride flag, making Major League Baseball history as the first MLB Team to publicly fly the Pride flag at a game … Rebecca Hale, Director of Public Information for the Mariners told Seattle Out & Proud this morning, “We’re a part of this community. Our fans are a reflection of our community. We thought this was an appropriate gesture on a day that is very meaningful to the LGBT community.”

This comes on the same day when, in case you hadn’t noticed, the Supreme Court issued a couple of big decisions today about gay marriage, so there is double the reason to celebrate.

If you care, my legal take on the opinions: the Defense of Marriage Act case seemed like a no-brainer Equal Protection case which the majority got right, even if it did shy away from the formalized strict-scrutiny analysis we have come to expect in Equal Protection cases. The law’s stated basis was essentially that homosexuality is wrong and icky and those people shouldn’t be able to do what other people can do. You have to make a much greater showing than that to treat one group of people differently than others under the law, and obviously no one ever bothered with that with DOMA.

The Prop 8 case from California had way weirder legal reasoning. Reasoning to do with standing that I think was erroneous and was picked up by the Court in an effort to skirt the issue of making a sweeping federal ruling about gay marriage. I feel like if they said there was standing and took it on that the Defense of Marriage Act majority may well have come to a pro-gay marriage ruling there too, but it didn’t happen. This means a good outcome but for odd legal reasons, which always makes me uncomfortable.

But yes: good outcomes. What my ex-wife and I did to marriage was way worse than anything gay people will do to it, and if they let us get married everyone should be allowed to.

But in all seriousness: People should be able to marry who they love. And I’m happy that today that is attainable for many more people than it was yesterday.

(via SBNation)

Adam Eaton sustains leg injury after tripping over first base

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Nationals’ outfielder Adam Eaton was carried off the field after stumbling over first base on Friday night. In the ninth inning of the Nationals’ 7-5 loss to the Mets, Eaton appeared to catch his ankle on the bag as he ran out an infield single, suffering a leg injury on the fall. He was unable to put pressure on his left leg after the play and required assistance by two of the Nationals’ athletic trainers as he exited the field.

Eaton is scheduled to undergo an MRI on Saturday, but Nationals’ manager Dusty Baker told reporters that it “doesn’t look too good.” It’s the first significant leg injury the outfielder has sustained since 2014, when he went on the 15-day disabled list with a hamstring strain. He’ll likely be replaced by Michael Taylor in center field for the next couple of games, though that could be a temporary fix as the Nationals seek a better solution during Eaton’s recovery process.

Madison Bumgarner likely sidelined through the All-Star break

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It’s been just over a week since Giants’ left-hander Madison Bumgarner got a serious scare after a nasty dirt bike accident. He escaped with bruised ribs and a Grade 2 strain of his left shoulder AC joint, but there was some speculation that the injuries would cause a significant, if not permanent, setback in the southpaw’s career. Thankfully, things aren’t looking quite so bleak today. Not only will Bumgarner not require surgery, but he could return as soon as the week following the All-Star break, the Giants said Friday.

Of course, that timeline is wholly dependent on how smoothly the recovery process goes, so nothing is set in stone yet. NBC Sports Bay Area’s Alex Pavlovic estimates 2-3 months of rest and rehab, including “two months before he can get back on the mound and then another three to four weeks of throwing and rehab starts before he’s big league-ready.” It’s a long and laborious schedule, but still looks much better than any surgical alternative.

Prior to the accident, Bumgarner was working on a solid start to the 2017 season. He maintained a 3.00 ERA, 1.3 BB/9 and 9.3 SO/9 through 27 innings with the club, though his average 1.75 runs of support per start fed into an 0-3 record.