The Cardinals put crosses on the mound. This is a problem?

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Bill McLellan of the Post-Dispatch is a bit uneasy:

Perhaps you saw the mention in Sunday’s Sports section about the Christian iconography on the mound at Busch Stadium. Apparently, somebody on the grounds crew etches a cross into the dirt. Perhaps that’s appropriate. This is a Christian team, and the Christianity leans toward the evangelical side.

…Still, I look at the photos of that cross etched on the mound and I get an uneasy feeling … Now there’s a cross etched on to the mound at Busch Stadium. Certainly, the players don’t seem bothered by it. Adam Wainwright told the Post-Dispatch’s Derrick Goold that the cross, and a looping figure said to represent Stan Musial’s number 6, had been there for all his starts. The tribute to Musial seems harmless. Not so the cross. Does religion need to be that prominent in a baseball game? I’m not pretending it’s a big deal. But still, I have an uneasy feeling about a cross etched on the mound.

Look, I’m a godless, lefty, agnostic, pinko degenerate (or so I’m told) but I’m really struggling to see how this is a problem. I also fail to see how this is even remotely related to national security and NSA spying and the Patriot Act and all of that, but McLellan goes there too.

The Cardinals aren’t the government. In most places of work employees are allowed to put up some sort of token or symbol of their religion, and the pitchers mound is the pitchers’ cubicle for all practical purposes. I’m not sure what the problem is here. I believe in the Constitution’s anti-establishment clause. But the notion, which is implicit in McClellan’s piece, that it or allied concerns extend to some sort of problem with the public expression of religion is pretty insane.

I get mad when the government sanctions religion or passes laws which are based in some particular religion’s morality. But if I’m a Cardinals fan I’m cool with this. I’m cool with them giving burnt offerings to pagan gods or pouring out rum for Jobu if it makes Cardinals pitchers work fast and throw strikes. How this is even a thing is beyond me.

Mets invite Tim Tebow to spring training

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Tim Tebow isn’t letting go of his major league dreams just yet. The former NFL quarterback is slated to appear with the Mets during spring training this year, extending what initially looked like an ill-fated career choice for at least one more season. Per the club’s official announcement on Friday, he’ll join a group of spring training invitees that includes top-30 prospects like Peter Alonso, P.J. Conlon, Patrick Mazeika and David Thompson.

Tebow, 30, hasn’t taken to professional baseball as gracefully as expected. He batted a cumulative .226/.309/.347 with eight home runs and a .656 OPS in 486 plate appearances for Single-A Columbia and High-A St. Lucie in 2017. While that wasn’t enough to compel the Mets to give the aging outfielder a big league tryout, there’s no denying that Tebow brought substantial benefit to their minor league affiliates — in the form of increased attendance figures and ticket sales, that is.

Even after the Mets were booted from the NL East race last September, they resisted the idea of promoting Tebow for a late-season attendance boost of their own. That’s not to say they’re planning on taking the same approach in 2018; Tebow will undoubtedly get his cup of coffee in the majors at some point, but for now, a Grapefruit League tryout is likely as close as he’ll ever get to playing with the team’s big league roster on an everyday basis.