The Cardinals put crosses on the mound. This is a problem?

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Bill McLellan of the Post-Dispatch is a bit uneasy:

Perhaps you saw the mention in Sunday’s Sports section about the Christian iconography on the mound at Busch Stadium. Apparently, somebody on the grounds crew etches a cross into the dirt. Perhaps that’s appropriate. This is a Christian team, and the Christianity leans toward the evangelical side.

…Still, I look at the photos of that cross etched on the mound and I get an uneasy feeling … Now there’s a cross etched on to the mound at Busch Stadium. Certainly, the players don’t seem bothered by it. Adam Wainwright told the Post-Dispatch’s Derrick Goold that the cross, and a looping figure said to represent Stan Musial’s number 6, had been there for all his starts. The tribute to Musial seems harmless. Not so the cross. Does religion need to be that prominent in a baseball game? I’m not pretending it’s a big deal. But still, I have an uneasy feeling about a cross etched on the mound.

Look, I’m a godless, lefty, agnostic, pinko degenerate (or so I’m told) but I’m really struggling to see how this is a problem. I also fail to see how this is even remotely related to national security and NSA spying and the Patriot Act and all of that, but McLellan goes there too.

The Cardinals aren’t the government. In most places of work employees are allowed to put up some sort of token or symbol of their religion, and the pitchers mound is the pitchers’ cubicle for all practical purposes. I’m not sure what the problem is here. I believe in the Constitution’s anti-establishment clause. But the notion, which is implicit in McClellan’s piece, that it or allied concerns extend to some sort of problem with the public expression of religion is pretty insane.

I get mad when the government sanctions religion or passes laws which are based in some particular religion’s morality. But if I’m a Cardinals fan I’m cool with this. I’m cool with them giving burnt offerings to pagan gods or pouring out rum for Jobu if it makes Cardinals pitchers work fast and throw strikes. How this is even a thing is beyond me.

Mets may move Asdrubal Cabrera to second base upon return from DL

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Newsday’s Marc Carig reports that the Mets may move Asdrubal Cabrera to second base when he returns from the disabled list. Cabrera has been on the disabled list since June 13 with a sprained left thumb, but he’s expected to be activated on Friday.

Cabrera, 31, last played second base in 2014 with the Nationals. He has played shortstop exclusively as a Met the last two seasons. Jose Reyes would continue to play shortstop if the Mets were to go through with the position change. Cabrera would displace T.J. Rivera, who has been playing second base in place of the injured Neil Walker.

In 196 plate appearances this season, Cabrera is hitting .244/.321/.392 with six home runs and 20 RBI. He has made 11 defensive errors, which is tied for the third-most among shortstops behind Tim Anderson (16) and Dansby Swanson (12).

Corey Knebel sets modern record for consecutive appearances with a strikeout

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Brewers closer Corey Knebel set a modern major league record for relievers to start a season, as Thursday’s appearance marked his 38th consecutive appearance with a strikeout. He set down the side in order in the ninth inning, striking Josh Bell out to start the frame.

Aroldis Chapman held the record previously, recording a strikeout in his first 37 appearances of the season in 2014 with the Reds.

Knebel, 25, has flown under the radar despite having an incredibly good season. He moved into the closer’s role in mid-May when Neftali Feliz, now a free agent, struggled. After Thursday’s appearance, Knebel is 12-for-15 in save chances with a 0.96 ERA and a 65/17 K/BB ratio in 37 2/3 innings.