Pitchers can throw fastballs because homo erectus evolved for the hunt

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I took a lot of physical anthropology in college and several allied primatology courses as well. I actually had more hours in those classes than I did in my major, political science, but because I didn’t take the proper cultural anthropology and archeology courses I couldn’t get the double major. Oh well. Fact remains that the anthro stuff sticks in my head better and informs more of my thinking than any of the poly sci stuff does. Mostly because it’s AWESOME.

So obviously this sort of thing is gonna be right up my alley: a study from Nature about how humans evolved to throw things really, really fast.

“We think that throwing was probably most important early on in terms of hunting behavior, enabling our ancestors to effectively and safely kill big game,” Roach said. “Eating more calorie-rich meat and fat would have allowed our ancestors to grow larger brains and bodies and expand into new regions of the world—all of which helped make us who we are today.”

With the development of spears and bows and guns and all of the other things the need to hurl projectiles became way less necessary. Pitcher’s ability to hurl fastballs, therefore, is nothing but an evolutionary hangover. Well, except for Rob Dibble. He’s still pretty much out there doing the caveman thing I presume.

Anyway, even if this stuff doesn’t interest you, you should read the article for two reasons:

1) There’s a diagram of a chimpanzee throwing a baseball, which would be amazing; and

2) This gif which looks an awful lot like raw video of a right-handed Chris Sale:

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Yankees’ offense wakes up, leads way to 8-1 win vs. Astros in ALCS Game 3

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The Yankees’ offense finally woke up, scoring eight runs in Game 3 of the ALCS on Monday night while the pitching kept the Astros’ offense at bay. That came after scoring a total of two runs against Astros pitching in the first two games. For a recap of the Yankees’ scoring in Game 3, click here.

CC Sabathia wasn’t dominant, but he executed pitches when he needed to most, preventing the Astros from capitalizing on their opportunities. Overall, he gave up three hits and four walks while striking out five on 99 pitches. He’s the first pitcher, age 37 or older, to throw six shutout innings in the postseason since Pedro Martinez for the Phillies against the Dodgers in Game 2 of the 2009 NLCS. Monday’s start also marked Sabathia’s first career scoreless outing in the postseason — it was his 22nd postseason appearance.

Astros starter Charlie Morton couldn’t escape the fourth inning, when he allowed a run and loaded the bases before departing. Will Harris allowed all three inherited runners to score on Aaron Judge‘s three-run home run to left field. Morton was ultimately charged with seven runs on six hits, two walks, and a hit batsman with three strikeouts in 3 2/3 innings.

The Yankees’ bullpen held the fort after the sixth. Adam Warren worked a scoreless seventh. Warren returned in the eighth and retired the side in order, despite yielding a pair of well-struck balls to deep center field.

In the ninth, Dellin Betances walked both hitters he faced to start the frame. Unsurprisingly, manager Joe Girardi had a short leash and brought in Tommy Kahnle. Kahnle gave up a single to Cameron Maybin then struck out George Springer, but walked Alex Bregman to force in a run. Kahnle got Jose Altuve to ground into a 4-3 double play to end the game in an 8-1 victory, giving the Yankees their first win of the series.

The ALCS continues on Tuesday at 5 PM ET. The Astros will start Lance McCullers and the Yankees will send Sonny Gray to the hill.