Charlie Manuel questions whether Phillies can make run

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After wrapping up one of the most frustrating homestands in recent memory with an 8-0 drubbing at the hands of the New York Mets, Charlie Manuel said he questions his team’s ability to put it together for a second-half surge. Via CSN Philly’s John Gonzalez:

But what if the team further decomposes during the road trip? It’s hard to imagine the Phillies grabbing new pieces if they don’t peek their head above .500 and keep it there for a while. If you have your doubts about their ability to do that, you have some company.

Does Manuel question whether these Phillies can go on a run?

“I wonder if we can do that,” Manuel admitted. “Yes.”

This afternoon’s eight-run loss moved the Phillies’ run differential to -58, the second-worst in the National League and third-worst in all of baseball behind the Marlins (-90) and Astros (-96). They are only four games under .500, but their expected record based on run differential pegs them at 12 games below .500 at 32-44. In other words, the Phillies are fortunate to even be where they are, and shouldn’t expect their current level of play to keep them within arm’s reach of contention going forward.

With a barren Minor League system and a host of veterans eligible for free agency after the season, it is looking unavoidable that the Phillies go into the deadline as sellers. If they do, they will do so for the first time since 2006, when they traded away franchise cornerstone Bobby Abreu to the New York Yankees.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.