Lucas Duda sent to New York for MRI on left side

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Lucas Duda has returned to New York in order to undergo an MRI on his left side, reports Adam Rubin of ESPN New York.

Duda complained of discomfort in his side following last night’s win over the Phillies. It sounds like he’s dealing with a potential strained oblique, which can be a pretty tricky injury, so a stint on the disabled list is a strong possibility.

Duda began the season as the starting left fielder, but he moved to first base this week with Ike Davis in the minor leagues. Davis has back-to-back two-homer games with Triple-A Las Vegas and is hitting .333 (13-for-39) with a 9/11 K/BB ratio since his demotion earlier this week, so Mets manager Terry Collins believes he “certainly has to be in the conversations” to be called up if Duda is placed on the disabled list. That would be a rapid return for someone who looked so lost when he was sent down, so general manager Sandy Alderson may have a different opinion on the matter.

Alex Wood to try pitching out of the stretch

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Pedro Moura of The Athletic reports that Dodgers starter Alex Wood plans to pitch out of the stretch throughout the 2018 season. Wood got the idea when he watched Nationals starter Stephen Strasburg pitch against the Dodgers.

Wood, 27, finished last season 16-3 with a 2.72 ERA and a 151/38 K/BB ratio in 152 1/3 innings. That’s a mighty fine season, one in which many pitchers would not dare to mess with something that isn’t broken.

Interestingly, Wood indeed has had better results with runners on base — when he would pitch out of the stretch — as opposed to the bases being empty, with a respective OPS allowed of .523 versus .684, respectively. Over his career, he has allowed a .617 OPS with runners on and .706 with the bases empty.

In response to Moura’s tweet about Wood, retired pitchers Dan Haren and Jered Weaver took the opportunity to burn themselves. Haren tweeted, “I pitched a few seasons completely out of the stretch actually, just not by choice.” Weaver responded, “Sometimes I would just step off and throw the ball in the gap myself because I knew the hitter would do it anyways.”