Bryce Harper Getty

Bryce Harper, Davey Johnson differ on return timing

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Nationals outfielder Bryce Harper, recovering from bursitis in his left knee, thinks that beginning his rehab assignment with Class-A Potomac on Tuesday is a day or two too early. Via MLB.com’s Tom Schad:

“Tuesday, that’s kind of early,” Harper said. “I’m thinking Wednesday or Thursday maybe. I’m not sure. We’ll see how I feel. If I feel good, then I’ll go play. If I feel something isn’t right, then I’m not going to go play. It depends on how I’m feeling.”

Manager Davey Johnson wants to get Harper back in action sooner rather than later.

“When a player starts playing, it’s really up to me, what I think they need. Not up to the player,” Johnson said. “I’m always trying to do what’s best for the player. But at the same time, it’s my job to know when they’re ready and when they’re not.

“He’s probably worried about timing and everything being letter perfect. All that changes if you’re in Potomac. You may never get your timing there because it’s a whole new ballgame there, guys don’t have command as well as they do up here, and there’s a big variation in how they pitch to guys.”

Schad also writes that Harper wants to play in six or seven rehab games before rejoining his teammates in Washington.

It is refreshing to see a player, particularly one as young as Harper (20), err on the side of caution. Too often, we see players come back too early from an injury or choose to play through the pain. In fact, Angel Pagan recently refused surgery to fix his injured hamstring and only exacerbated the problem.

New Jersey woman files suit against the Brewers after being struck by a batting practice foul ball

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA - APRIL 11: New protective netting now protects lower deck fans from dugout to dugout at Citizens Bank Park before an opening day game between the San Diego Padres and Philadelphia Phillies on April 11, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Rich Schultz/Getty Images)
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A woman from Camden County in New Jersey has filed suit against the Milwaukee Brewers after being struck by a foul ball during batting practice two years ago at Miller Park, Jeff Goldman of NJ.com reports. According to her lawsuit, she suffered an orbital fracture to her left eye socket, nerve and iris damage, and a concussion.

The woman, Dana Morelli, was in the second row behind third base along with her fiancee and his son when she was struck by the foul ball. She had to remain in a dark room in Milwaukee before being able to safely travel home. (Sensitivity to light is a common symptom of a concussion.)

Fan safety has become a hot button topic recently. This past December, Major League Baseball issued safety recommendations but ultimately left it up to each ballpark to decide by how much to extend the netting.

Earlier this month, Phillies infielder Freddy Galvis fouled off a pitch that struck a fan. After the game, he clamored for the Phillies to increase protective netting at Citizens Bank Park to extend to the seats behind the dugout, where the fan was hit. Another fan was hit the next day and Galvis threw up his hands in frustration. While fans and owners seem to mostly be against netting, the players seem to be for it.

Mike Leake placed on the disabled list with shingles

Mike Leake
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The Cardinals have placed starter Mike Leake on the 15-day disabled list, retroactive to August 22, with shingles. Which: ugh. Anyone I’ve ever known who has had it wouldn’t wish it on their worst enemy.

Leake was diagnosed with the virus last week and had to be scratched from his scheduled start Saturday versus the Athletics. There is no timetable for Leake’s return. Leake is 9-9 with a 4.56 ERA in 25 starts for the Cardinals. Poor dude.