Munenori Kawasaki hits first career home run

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Blue Jays shortstop Munenori Kawasaki hit his first career home run in the seventh inning of tonight’s game against the Orioles. It was a two-run shot to right field off of Tommy Hunter that tied the game at six apiece. After rounding the bases and getting a round of high-fives in the dugout, his teammates pushed him back out into the field so he could acknowledge a raucous Toronto crowd. Kawasaki meekly emerged and politely bowed in several directions.

You may remember Kawasaki when he gave one of the best post-game interviews in baseball history after helping the Jays walk off victorious on May 26.

Kawasaki had entered the night with baseball’s second-longest career homerless streak among active non-pitchers, having racked up 287 plate appearances without going yard. Phillies outfielder Ben Revere leads the pack, by far, with 1,315.

Here’s the full list of players with a streak of at least 100 PA:

Rk Player PA HR From To Age Tm
1 Ben Revere 1315 0 2010 2013 22-25 MIN-PHI
2 Munenori Kawasaki 287 0 2012 2013 31-32 SEA-TOR
3 J.B. Shuck 239 0 2011 2013 24-26 HOU-LAA
4 Chase d’Arnaud 157 0 2011 2012 24-25 PIT
5 Justin Christian 155 0 2008 2012 28-32 NYY-SFG
6 Robbie Grossman 131 0 2013 2013 23-23 HOU
7 Chris Marrero 127 0 2011 2013 22-24 WSN
8 Jesus Feliciano 119 0 2010 2010 31-31 NYM
9 Jordan Brown 106 0 2010 2013 26-29 CLE-MIA
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
Generated 6/21/2013.

The Jays, by the way, walked off in the ninth on an RBI single by Rajai Davis. The 7-6 victory was the Jays’ ninth in a row, bringing them to .500 as they continue to gain ground in the AL East. As recently as June 10, the Jays were 12 games behind the first-place Red Sox. After the Sox wrap up their victory over the Orioles, the Jays will be a mere seven games behind.

Update (10:45 PM) — Had to add this in here:

The Baltimore Orioles did not try to get Shohei Ohtani . . . out of principle

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Shohei Ohtani made it pretty clear early in the posting process that he was not going to consider east coast teams. As such, it’s understandable if east coast teams didn’t stop all work in order to put together an Ohtani pitch before he signed with the Angels. The Baltimore Orioles, however, didn’t do so for a somewhat different reason than all of the other also-rans.

Their reason, as explained by general manager Dan Duquette on MLB Network Radio yesterday was “because philosophically we don’t participate on the posting part of it.” Suggesting that, as a matter of policy, they will not even attempt to sign Japanese players via the posting system.

Like I said, that probably didn’t make a hill of beans’ difference when it came to Ohtani, who was unlikely to give the O’s the time of day. I find it really weird, though, that the Orioles would totally reject the idea of signing Japanese players via the posting system on policy grounds. None of their opponents are willing to unilaterally disarm in that fashion, I presume.

More than that, though, why would you make that philosophy public? Don’t you want your rivals to think you’re in competition with them in all facets of the game? Don’t you want your fans to think that you’ll stop at nothing to improve the team?

An odd thing to say for Duquette. I don’t know quite why he’d say such a thing.