Dayton Moore blames Kauffman Stadium for the Royals poor walk rate

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Know who walks a lot? Players with plate patience and good strike zone judgment Know who doesn’t walk a lot? Players with lousy plate patient or strike zone judgment. Both of those kinds of players are further impacted by playing for organizations which either encourage or discourage players who work the count.

Dayton Moore, general manager of the Kansas City Royals, however, thinks something else is at play with his team’s poor walk rates over the years: the ballpark:

“We have the largest ballpark in terms of square footage of any ballpark in baseball,” Moore says. “When pitchers come here, they have the mindset to use that park — put the ball in play, throw strikes, attack the zone. There isn’t the same fear factor of getting beat deep that you might have elsewhere.

“I think that plays a huge factor in that walk statistic.”

  • Kansas City Royals walks at home in 2012: 202
  • Kansas City Royals walks on the road in 2012: 202
  • Kansas City Royals walks at home in 2011: 235
  • Kansas City Royals walks on the road in 2011: 207

They had more walks on the road in 2010 than at home. They had a TON more walks at home than on the road in 2009. I’m not sure what exactly this all means, but I will say that blaming opposing pitchers’ approach at Kauffman vs. on the road doesn’t seem to carry a lot of explanatory juice.

What does is the fact that the Royals, as an organization, have never really valued players with plate discipline and have done things like sign Jeff Francoeur to multi-year deals. It’s also worth noting that back in the days of George Brett, Darryl Porter and Amos Otis, the Royals walked a lot. And played in the same ballpark.

So hey, if it makes you feel better to blame the park, Dayton, go ahead. Just please show us some evidence that the park is to blame.

Aaron Judge set a new postseason strikeout record

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For a few days, it looked like Aaron Judge was finally hitting his stride in the postseason. He was still striking out at a regular clip, piling more and more strikeouts atop the 16 he racked up in the Division Series, but he was mashing, too. He engineered a three-run homer during Game 3 of the Championship Series, followed by another blast and game-tying double in Game 4. His one-out double helped pad a five-run lead in Game 5, while his 425-footer off of Brad Peacock barely made a dent during a 7-1 loss in Game 6. And then Lance McCullers‘ curveball found and fooled him, as it did five of the 14 batters it met in Game 7:

The strikeout was Judge’s first of the evening and 27th since the start of the playoffs. No other major league batter has racked up that many strikeouts in a single postseason, though Alfonso Soriano’s 26-strikeout record in 2003 comes the closest. Within that record, Judge also collected three golden sombreros (four strikeouts in a single game), narrowly avoiding the dreaded platinum sombrero (five strikeouts in a single game).

It’s an unfortunate footnote to a spectacular year for the rookie outfielder, who decimated the competition with 52 home runs and 8.2 fWAR during the regular season and was a pivotal part of the Yankees’ playoff run. Thankfully, the image of McCullers’ curveball darting just under Judge’s bat won’t be the image that sticks with us for years to come. Instead, it’ll look something like this: