Albert Pujols is finally feeling good (and hitting)

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Between his poor production at the plate and labored running on the bases it’s been painful to watch Albert Pujols this season, but the future Hall of Famer has quietly started to turn things around this month.

Pujols is hitting .313 with four homers, five doubles, and a .952 OPS in 17 games this month, compared to .246 with a .733 OPS in April and May, and the 33-year-old told Alden Gonzalez of MLB.com: “I feel right now like my old me, like when I was in St. Louis.”

Pujols also admitted that he never felt good last season: “There were some streaks here and there that I hit, but I was battling. I never got to a point where I could say, ‘Holy cow, that’s my bat speed.'”

Obviously hitting well for a few weeks in June isn’t conclusive proof of Pujols returning to his old self, but the Angels will take any signs of optimism they can get at this point and he’s made some adjustments at the plate to take less of a toll on his knee and foot problems.

Report: Mets have discussed a Matt Harvey trade with at least two teams

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Kristie Ackert of the New York Daily News reports that the Mets have discussed a trade involving starter Matt Harvey with at least two teams. Apparently, the Mets were even willing to move Harvey for a reliever.

The Mets tendered Harvey a contract on December 1. He’s entering his third and final year of arbitration eligibility and will likely see a slight bump from last season’s salary of $5.125 million. As a result, there was some thought going into late November that the Mets would non-tender Harvey.

Harvey, 28, made 18 starts and one relief appearance last year and had horrendous results. He put up a 6.70 ERA with a 67/47 K/BB ratio in 92 2/3 innings. Between his performance, his impending free agency, and his injury history, the Mets aren’t likely to get much back in return for Harvey. Even expecting a reliever in return may be too lofty.

Along with bullpen help, the Mets also need help at second base, first base, and the outfield. They don’t have many resources with which to address those needs. Ackert described the Mets’ resources as “a very limited stash of prospects” and “limited payroll space.”